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I have this problem, I have two divs:

<div style="width:100%; height:50px;" id="div1"></div>
<div style="width:100%;" id="div2"></div>

How do I make div2 occupy remaining height of the page?

share|improve this question
2  
Should there ever be a vertical scrollbar? What happens when the content inside #div2 is taller than the window? – thirtydot Aug 25 '11 at 23:17
1  
use a table set to height=100%. use 2 rows instead of 2 divs – Johnny Craig Aug 25 '11 at 23:19
2  
Don't use tables when there is a simpler solution. – Alexander Rafferty Aug 25 '11 at 23:23
up vote 39 down vote accepted

Use absolute positioning:

#div1{
    width: 100%;
    height: 50px;
    background-color:red;/*Development Only*/
}
#div2{
    width: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    top: 50px;
    bottom: 0;
    background-color:blue;/*Development Only*/
}
<div id="div1"></div>
<div id="div2"></div>

share|improve this answer
5  
the absolute positioning is not strictly necessary on the first one. – Joseph Marikle Aug 25 '11 at 23:28
1  
True, but there is no harm either. – Alexander Rafferty Aug 25 '11 at 23:36
2  
If there is no need for it, it's existence is harming you. – Shane Mar 3 at 22:03
3  
What if we dont know the heights ? – user198989 Apr 1 at 2:13

You can use this http://jsfiddle.net/Victornpb/S8g4E/783/

#container {
    display: table;
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
}
#container > div{
    display: table-row;
    height: 0;
}
#container > div.fill{
    height: auto;
}

Just apply the class .fill to any of the children to make then occupy the remaining height.

<div id="container">
    <div>
        Lorem ipsum
    </div>
    <div>
        Lorem ipsum
    </div>
    <div class="fill">   <!-- this will fill the remaining height-->
        Lorem ipsum
    </div>
</div>

It works with how many children you want, no additional markup is required.

share|improve this answer
6  
this is great but if you change #container.height: 400px to #container.height = 100% is does not work any more. Is there a way to make to container fill the available height? – Martin Meeser Mar 24 '14 at 8:35
1  
Thanks, this is exactly what I needed. It's a bit ridiculous that the only way to accomplish this with variable heights is by using tables or JavaScript. They get a bad rap, but tables did a lot of things right. – Gavin Dec 10 '14 at 17:29
3  
@Gavin a div with display: table is not a table. – herman Sep 2 '15 at 18:37
    
@herman it behaves the same as a table. It's the behavior of tables that got a bad rap, not that it was named "table". – Gavin Sep 3 '15 at 12:39
3  
@Gavin as far as I know it's the fact that a semantic element like <table> should not be used for layout purposes. display: table provides a way to get similar behaviour without implying the same semantics. – herman Sep 3 '15 at 14:00

Demo

One way is to set the the div to position:absolute and give it a top of 50px and bottom of 0px;

#div2
{
    position:absolute;
    bottom:0px;
    top:50px
}
share|improve this answer
7  
What if there are other elements with heights which aren't fixed? – Mark Oct 7 '12 at 0:31
2  
@Mark: good point. This solution doesn't work if the preceding elements have a dynamic or unknown height. In this case I think the only solution would be javascript. Like here for example: stackoverflow.com/questions/2023512/… – Jules Colle Nov 27 '12 at 8:22
    
great - amazing ! – Yugal Jindle Mar 30 '13 at 3:34

With CSS tables, you could wrap a div around the two you have there and use this css/html structure:

<style type="text/css">
.container { display:table; width:100%; height:100%;  }
#div1 { display:table-row; height:50px; background-color:red; }
#div2 { display:table-row; background-color:blue; }
</style>

<div class="container">
    <div id="div1"></div>
    <div id="div2"></div>
</div>

Depends on what browsers support these display types, however. I don't think IE8 and below do. EDIT: Scratch that-- IE8 does support CSS tables.

share|improve this answer
    
height 100% is not making the height 100% – Nick Manning Jun 20 '14 at 22:45
2  
Your html,body also need to be height:100% – Brendan Jun 20 '14 at 22:46

Since you know how many pixels are occupied by the previous content, you can use the calc() function:

height: calc(100% - 50px);
share|improve this answer
    
As of this writing, calc is not well supported: caniuse.com/#feat=calc – kalu Mar 17 at 18:42
2  
@kalu Only Opera Mini, IE8 and old stock Android browser (4.3) won't work. Nobody cares about IE8 and Android 4.3 market share is negligible. Opera Mini has more market share, but seems to lack support for a lot of modern things. You could specify a fallback height as a percentage on the line before, which will get overridden in browsers that support calc. – herman Mar 18 at 9:31
    
I'd say that was pretty good support – SpoonMeiser May 26 at 13:28
<div>
  <div id="header">header</div>
  <div id="content">content</div>
  <div id="footer">footer</div>
</div>

#header {
  height: 200px;
}

#content {
  height: 100%;
  margin-bottom: -200px;
  padding-bottom: 200px;
  margin-top: -200px;
  padding-top: 200px;
}

#footer {
  height: 200px;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
please, add some explanation to your answer. – AlexKM Jan 13 '15 at 11:11
    
@AlexKM sorry for my poor English.#content will occupy remaining height of the outer div. – wmzy Jan 14 '15 at 9:00

Why not use padding with negative margins? Something like this:

<div class="parent">
  <div class="child1">
  </div>
  <div class="child2">
  </div>
</div>

And then

.parent {
  padding-top: 1em;
}
.child1 {
  margin-top: -1em;
  height: 1em;
}
.child2 {
  margin-top: 0;
  height: 100%;
}
share|improve this answer

I tried with CSS, and or you need to use display: table or you need to use new css that is not yet supported on most browsers (2016).

So, I wrote a jquery plugin to do it for us, I am happy to share it:

 
//Credit Efy Teicher
$(document).ready(function () {
            $(".fillHight").fillHeight();
            $(".fillWidth").fillWidth();
        });

        window.onresize = function (event) {
            $(".fillHight").fillHeight();
            $(".fillWidth").fillWidth();
        }

        $.fn.fillHeight = function () {
            var siblingsHeight = 0;
            this.siblings("div").each(function () {
                siblingsHeight = siblingsHeight + $(this).height();
            });

            var height = this.parent().height() - siblingsHeight;
            this.height(height);
        };

 
        $.fn.fillWidth = function (){
            var siblingsWidth = 0;
            this.siblings("div").each(function () {
                siblingsWidth  += $(this).width();
            });

            var width =this.parent().width() - siblingsWidth;
            this.width(width);
        }
      * {
            box-sizing: border-box;
        }

        html {
        }

        html, body, .fillParent {
            height: 100%;
            margin: 0;
            padding: 0;
        }
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.0.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="fillParent" style="background-color:antiquewhite">
        <div>
            no1
        </div>
        <div class="fillHight">
            no2 fill
        </div>
        <div class="deb">
            no3
        </div>
    </div>

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