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I currently have an application with a GUI.

Would it be possible to use this same application from the commandline (without GUI and with using parameters).

Or do I have to create a separate .exe (and application) for the commandline tool?

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you can absolutely use the same application. Just add string[] args to your Main method –  Alastair Pitts Aug 26 '11 at 0:10
    
Or, have a look at the answers to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1179532 –  Alastair Pitts Aug 26 '11 at 0:15
    
Since you're not asking about reading input from the console (only from command line parameters), this is a dupe. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 26 '11 at 0:17
1  
@PeeHaa: It is as simple as not running the line Application.Run(new MyMainForm());, then. Place it in an if block, and if you get arguments, don't run that line of code. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 26 '11 at 0:57
1  
@Merlyn Morgan-Graham: omg it's that simple... Sweet! tnx –  PeeHaa Aug 26 '11 at 0:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 29 down vote accepted
  1. Edit your project properties to make your app a "Windows Application" (not "Console Application"). You can still accept command line parameters this way. If you don't do this, then a console window will pop up when you double-click on the app's icon.
  2. Make sure your Main function accepts command line parameters.
  3. Don't show the window if you get any command line parameters.

Here's a short example:

[STAThread]
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    if(args.Length == 0)
    {
        Application.Run(new MyMainForm());
    }
    else
    {
        // Do command line/silent logic here...
    }
}

If your app isn't already structured to cleanly do silent processing (if all your logic is jammed into your WinForm code), you can hack silent processing in ala CharithJ's answer.

EDIT by OP Sorry to hijack your answer Merlyn. Just want all the info here for others.

To be able to write to console in a WinForms app just do the following:

static class Program
{
    // defines for commandline output
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    static extern bool AttachConsole(int dwProcessId);
    private const int ATTACH_PARENT_PROCESS = -1;

    /// <summary>
    /// The main entry point for the application.
    /// </summary>
    [STAThread]
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // redirect console output to parent process;
        // must be before any calls to Console.WriteLine()
        AttachConsole(ATTACH_PARENT_PROCESS);

        if (args.Length > 0)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Yay! I have just created a commandline tool.");
            // sending the enter key is not really needed, but otherwise the user thinks the app is still running by looking at the commandline. The enter key takes care of displaying the prompt again.
            System.Windows.Forms.SendKeys.SendWait("{ENTER}");
            Application.Exit();
        }
        else
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            Application.Run(new QrCodeSampleApp());
        }
    }
}
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if all your logic is jammed into your WinForm code. It is :P It's a good thing though, since I'm a complete novice, and because it 'bites me in the ass' now I'll remember it for future projects. I think I have some cleaning to do. –  PeeHaa Aug 26 '11 at 1:16
    
last question before I go to sleep: will I be able to write a message to the commandline when for example the program is finished running? Or is it either a separate app which can write to commandline or don't write to commandline? –  PeeHaa Aug 26 '11 at 1:25
3  
updated your answer. Hope you don't mind :) –  PeeHaa Aug 26 '11 at 14:14
1  
Don't mind at all. Note that Console.WriteLine will go the bit-bucket with this solution if you double-clicked on the app. Also, you can check Marshal.GetLastWin32Error if you care when the attach failed. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 26 '11 at 18:11
1  
@PeeHaa Thanks, this works quite well, however it seems that for me it is running in a separate thread (e.g. the command prompt returns immediately without waiting for the processing that started in Main to complete. Is that expected? –  Kohanz Jul 10 '13 at 14:24

In your program.cs class keep the Main method as it is but add string[] Args to the main form. For example...

    [STAThread]
    static void Main(string[] Args)
    {
        ....
        Application.Run(new mainform(Args));
    }

In mainform.cs constructor

    public mainform(string[] Args)
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        if (Args.Length > 0)
         {
             // Do what you want to do as command line application.
             // You can hide the form and do processing silently.
             // Remember to close the form after processing.
         }
    }
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3  
best way to do it –  xbonez Aug 26 '11 at 0:57
2  
+1; But don't even bother doing Application.Run if you're running as a console app. Hiding the window will work, but it is a hack :) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 26 '11 at 0:59

I think it is possible, just set your subsystem to "console", you will see a console window as well as the GUI window.

But in order to accept commands from the console window, I guess you will have to create an extra thread to do it.

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This is not a good option because it will spawn an additional console if they launch it by double-clicking on the file icon. Also, you don't necessarily have to spawn another thread - for example, if you pass your "commands" via command line parameters. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 26 '11 at 0:15

You may need to structure your Application as a Console Application, identify what you do on "Actions" - like clicking of the button - into separate class, include a form that can be shown if there were no command line arguments supplied, and handle events by routing them to the common methods in your "Action" class.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't make it a console app. Otherwise a console will pop up when you launch it as a GUI. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 26 '11 at 0:54

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