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See the code below - I want to know how to, or if it is even possible to, write the body of A::DoThisOrThat()

class A
{
  void DoThis( void ) { // any function body you like... }
  void DoThat( void ) { // any function body you like... }

  void DoThisOrThat( const bool doThis );
};

void A::DoThisOrThat( const bool doThis )
{
    void (*pMemberFunction)( void );
    pMemberFunction = doThis? &A::DoThis : &A::DoThat;

    (*pMemberFunction)();    // member function invoked controlled by parameter
}

All three lines of this function may need rewriting to correctly scope the member function. As written, I get a calling convention conflict on the second line where I assign pMemberFunction. I cannot lay my hands on a simple example clarifying this - all the examples easily found declare a member variable to hold the member function pointer. Can I not just create a local variable to do the same?

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Pointer-to-member syntax always makes my head hurt... – Michael Burr Aug 26 '11 at 0:32
up vote 6 down vote accepted

I might be missing something, but isn't it much easier and simpler to do this?

void A::DoThisOrThat(bool doThis) 
{ 
    if(doThis) { DoThis(); }
    else       { DoThat(); }
}

Assuming you really want to go the function pointer route, realize that pointer to member functions are completely different beasts from pointers to non-member functions. One of the ways they are different is that you need to provide an object for the function to invoke upon. The syntax is as follows:

void A::DoThisOrThat(bool doThis) 
{ 
    void (A::*pMemberFunction)();
    pMemberFunction = doThis ? &A::DoThis : &A::DoThat;
    (this->*pMemberFunction)();
} 

Note that when declaring a pointer to member function, you have to also specify the class (note the A::*) and the object (note the this->*). Also remember that when forming pointers to members you have to fully qualify the function name, even within the class, and use the ampersand (e.g. &A::DoThis, which you've correctly done).

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Thanks - clear, comprehensive and quick answer :) The reason I want to take the function pointer route is because I'm in effect busy waiting while I read from a device register, and don't want to repeatedly test one of several conditions to decide which function I need to call to poll the device. – omatai Aug 26 '11 at 0:48

Member functions aren't free functions, and pointers-to-member-function (PTMF) are not function pointers! They're entirely incompatible. (Typically they are much bigger.) Much more importantly, you can only call a member function if you have both a PTMF and an instance pointer.

So, you have to say:

void A::DoThisOrThat( const bool doThis )
{
    void (A::*pMemberFunction)( void );
    pMemberFunction = doThis? &A::DoThis : &A::DoThat;

    (this->*pMemberFunction)();
}

(Not that there's any reason for this amount of indirection if all you want is to branch on one local conditional.)

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1  
Awesome - I knew there had to be a simple way to scope it to the class and instance. As it happens, I need to apply this principle inside a loop which is busily polling a device register, so avoiding repeatedly calling the "if" statement is a bonus. Thanks! – omatai Aug 26 '11 at 0:45

Replace these:

void (*pMemberFunction)( void );
(*pMemberFunction)();    // member function invoked controlled by parameter

with:

void (A::*pMemberFunction)( void );
(*this->pMemberFunction)();    // member function invoked controlled by parameter
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