Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm attempting to run some tests on my Spring web app and it seems I'm having some issues initially inserting records in a DB to use my tests with. My setup is as follows:

Unit Test Setup which extends TestBase:

@Before
public void setup() {
    setupBase();
    configurationDao = (ConfigurationDao)ctx.getBean("configDao");       
    setupReasons(configurationDao.getEm());
}

TestBase:

public class TestBase {

    protected ApplicationContext ctx;

    public void setupBase() {
        ctx = new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("applicationContext.xml");
    }

    public static String getRandomUUIDStyleId() {
        return UUID.randomUUID().toString().substring(0, 24);
    }

    @Transactional
    public void setupReasons(EntityManager em) {
        DateTime now = new DateTime();
        for (Reason reason : Reasons.values()) {
            ReasonEntity r = new ReasonEntity();
            r.setId(reason.ordinal());
            r.setReason(reason.name());
            em.persist(r);
        }
    }
}

BaseDao which Configuration extends:

public abstract class BaseDao<T extends EntityBase> implements Dao<T> {

    @PersistenceContext
    protected EntityManager em;
    protected Class<T> entityClass;

    @Transactional
    public T findById(long id) {
        return em.find(entityClass, id);
    }

    @Transactional
    public List<T> findAll() {
        Query query = em.createQuery("from " + entityClass.getName());
        return (List<T>) query.getResultList();
    }

    @Transactional
    public T persistOrMerge(T entity) {
        if (entity.getId() == null || entity.getId() == 0) {
            //System.out.println("Persisting: "+entity.toString());
            em.persist(entity);
        } else {
            if (!em.contains(entity)) {
                //System.out.println("Merging: "+entity.toString());
                return em.merge(entity);
            }
        }
        return entity;
    }

    public void remove(T entity) {
        em.remove(entity);
    }

    public EntityManager getEm() {
        return em;
    }
}

applicationContext.xml:

<bean id="configDao" class="ConfigurationDao" />
    <bean class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.support.PersistenceAnnotationBeanPostProcessor" />
    <bean class="org.springframework.dao.annotation.PersistenceExceptionTranslationPostProcessor"/>
    <bean id="entityManagerFactory" class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.LocalEntityManagerFactoryBean" >
        <property name="persistenceUnitName" value="TEST-pu" />
    </bean>
    <bean id="transactionManager" class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.JpaTransactionManager">
        <property name="entityManagerFactory" ref="entityManagerFactory" />
    </bean>
    <tx:annotation-driven transaction-manager="transactionManager" proxy-target-class="true"  />

While setupReasons "appears" to be persisting it never inserts the data into the MySql table (seen through hibernate showsql property) and I can't seem to understand why. Thanks in advance for your help and if you need anything else from me I'm more than happy to provide.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Despite the fact that setupReasons() is marked @Transactional, I don't see anything to make me think a transaction is being started for it. Without a transaction, nothing will be written. You might want to read up on the Spring test framework.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you referring to em.getTransaction.begin() / commit()? To my understanding the @Transactional annotation performs this on the method, am I wrong in assuming this? –  Andrew Aug 26 '11 at 5:56
    
@Transactional isn't magic. You have to have something to scan for and process the annotation, such as the Spring test framework, which I linked in my answer. Nothing in the code you posted would activate it, and therefore no transaction would ever be started. –  Ryan Stewart Aug 26 '11 at 14:55

Follow this tutorial to make your test classes transaction aware using spring:

http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/2.5.x/reference/testing.html

Use p6spy to inspect what is exactly being sent to the database, including start and commit transaction statements.

p6spy | http://www.mkyong.com/hibernate/how-to-display-hibernate-sql-parameter-values-solution/

share|improve this answer

For someone who still is facing this issue, just put the annotation @TransactionConfiguration in your class and that's it!

Check it out on @TransactionConfiguration

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.