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I have the following code and I just can't seem to figure out a way to get the strings reversed here:

stringstream convert;
string y="";
string z="";
convert << x;
string::reverse_iterator rit;
y=convert.str();
int j=0;
for (rit = y.rbegin(); rit < y.rend(); rit++){
    z[j] = *rit;
    j++;
}

Can someone help me out with this? Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Sidenote. If your intent is to convert numbers to strings, you don't(may not) need stringstreams or boost or sprintf anymore. C++11 has a to_string function overloaded for all sorts of numeric types. – Benjamin Lindley Aug 26 '11 at 2:12
    
@Benjamin: Nice, I was unaware of that. – Dave S Aug 26 '11 at 2:44
up vote 15 down vote accepted
z.assign(y.rbegin(), y.rend());

Or you can do it upon construction:

std::string z(y.rbegin(), y.rend());

If you want to modify a string in place, use std::reverse:

std::reverse(y.begin(), y.end());
share|improve this answer
    
I decided to go with this one because of the great amount of explanation offered here. I was really torn between this one Chris Jester-Young below since you both offered excellent answers. – HunderingThooves Aug 26 '11 at 2:48

I'd do this:

stringstream convert;
convert << x;
string y(convert.str());
string z(y.rbegin(), y.rend());
return z;

No need to write a manual loop!

share|improve this answer
1  
This is also an excellent answer, I think that despite Templatetypedef beating you by a matter of seconds that I'll end up accepting this one for the sake of code optimization. – HunderingThooves Aug 26 '11 at 1:54
    
Is x already a string? You can just say, return std::string(x.rbegin(), x.rend());. – Kerrek SB Aug 26 '11 at 1:56
    
@Kerrek: Unlikely, since the stringstream is being used for, essentially, a lexical_cast. – Chris Jester-Young Aug 26 '11 at 1:57
    
@Chris -- Correct, I'm using stringstream since I haven't yet delved into the Boost libraries, The function the code above appears in actually returns a bool already, so I couldn't just return it like that. – HunderingThooves Aug 26 '11 at 2:06

Using std::reverse is easier.

std::reverse( source.begin(), source.end() ); // source is of type std::string
share|improve this answer
    
Note that it will reverse the string in-place, not create another string which is reversed. – Seth Carnegie Aug 26 '11 at 1:55
    
@Seth - Yes, that is the reason I didn't mention any return value. – Mahesh Aug 26 '11 at 1:55
2  
yeah I know you know, but I don't know he knows :) Just mentioning it for the sake of avoiding ambiguities and misunderstandings. – Seth Carnegie Aug 26 '11 at 1:58

I think that your problem is in this loop:

int j=0;
for (rit = y.rbegin(); rit < y.rend(); rit++){
    z[j] = *rit;
    j++;
}

Notice that you're writing into the string z at various positions. However, you haven't actually initialized z so that there's any elements in it, so this is writing to nonexistent locations, which results in undefined behavior.

To fix this, instead of writing to locations in z, try appending new characters to the end:

for (rit = y.rbegin(); rit < y.rend(); rit++){
    z += *rit;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Glorious, thanks for the help, this question was so simple that it eluded me for the better part of 20 minutes, thanks! – HunderingThooves Aug 26 '11 at 1:53
2  
@Hundering while this answer is correct, you probably shouldn't do it this way because it's neither concise nor efficient. Look at some of the other answers for better ways. – Seth Carnegie Aug 26 '11 at 1:54
    
@Hundering- I wrote this answer and don't want you to accept it... you should definitely use another approach! – templatetypedef Aug 26 '11 at 2:06

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