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Suppose I drew some simple lines in OpenGL like this:

glBegin(GL_LINES);
glVertex2f(1, 5);
glVertex2f(0, 1);
glEnd();

How do I make the line look jittery, like it was being sketched or drawn with hand?

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Like it draws in a little at a time, or like the line itself looks ragged (Not pixelated)? –  Michael Dorgan Aug 26 '11 at 2:53
    
Basically it means you need to update vertices positions each frame with a little jitter from initial position. I have a sample code doing exactly this in Delphi: doodles.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/Sketching –  Krom Stern Aug 26 '11 at 5:29

1 Answer 1

You could try breaking your line up into segments then adding some random noise with rand().

Here's some ugly but hopefully somewhat useful code. You can refactor this as needed:

const float X1= 1.0f, Y1 = 5.0f, X2 = 0.0f, Y2 = 1.0f;
const int NUM_PTS = 10; //however many points in between

//you will need to call srand() to seed your random numbers

glBegin(GL_LINES);
glVertex2f(START_X, START_Y);
for(unsigned i = 0; i < NUM_PTS; i += 2)
{
  float t = (float)i/NUM_PTS;
  float rx = (rand() % 200 - 100)/100.0f; //random perturbation in x
  float ry = (rand() % 200 - 100)/100.0f; //random perturbation in y
  glVertex2f( t * (END_X - START_X) + r, t * (END_Y - START_Y) + r);
  glVertex2f((t + 1) * (END_X - START_X), (t + 1) * (END_Y - START_Y));
}
glVertex2f(END_X, END_Y);
glEnd();

I increment the loop by 2 and draw every other point without random perturbation so that the line segments are all joined together.

You might want to be aware of the fact that the glBegin/glEnd style is called "immediate mode" and is not very efficient. It's not even supported on some mobile platforms. If you find your stuff is sluggish look at using vertex arrays.

To make the line look hand-drawn and nicer you might also want to make it fatter and use anti-aliasing.

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In curve strokes, would this work for bezier curves? –  Carven Aug 27 '11 at 1:05
    
You could use the same technique for bézier curves, assuming you have a way to manipulate the vertices you are drawing. Not sure how great the effect would look.. it is something you'll probably have to fiddle with, but that's standard when it comes to graphics. –  mwd Aug 28 '11 at 1:01
    
Apparently, the lines are in random positions all over the surrounding of the main line, which is defined by the START_X and START_Y to their ENDs. Is there anything I need to take note while trying to fiddle with it? –  Carven Aug 28 '11 at 9:39

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