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I'm currently learning Scala and I have some problems designing my case classes. I need two case classes that have the same properties. So I thought I would be a good idea to inherit from an abstract base class that defines these properties. However this code does not compile

abstract class Resource(val uri : String)

case class File(uri : String) extends Resource(uri)
case class Folder(uri : String) extends Resource(uri)

because uri in the case class constructors would overwrite the uri property of the base class.

What would be the correct way to design this?

I want to be able to do something like this

val arr = Array[Resource](File("test"), Folder("test2"))

arr.foreach { r : Resource => r match {
  case f : File => println("It's a file")
  case f : Folder => println("It's a folder")
} }

The "equivalent" Java code should be something like

abstract class Resource {
   private String uri;

   public Resource(String uri) {
       this.uri = uri
   }

   public String getUri() {
       return uri;
   }
}

// same for Folder
class File extends Resource {
    public File(String uri) {
        super(uri);
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The correct syntax should be:

abstract class Resource {
   val uri: String
}

case class File(uri : String) extends Resource
case class Folder(uri : String) extends Resource


Stream[Resource](File("test"), Folder("test2")) foreach { 
  r : Resource => r match {
   case f : File => println("It's a file")
   case f : Folder => println("It's a folder")
} }

EDIT

Without case classes:

abstract class Resource(val uri : String)

class File(uri : String) extends Resource(uri) {
   override def toString = "..."
}
object File {
   def apply(uri: String) = new File(uri)
}

class Folder(uri : String) extends Resource(uri) {
   override def toString = "..."
}
object Folder {
   def apply(uri: String) = new Folder(uri)
}
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However this duplicates the uri property and getter in both File and Folder. Is there any chance to get clean code that looks like the Java example in my question? –  Sven Jacobs Aug 26 '11 at 7:04
    
Then why you use case classes? Case classes add getter and setters. Write normal classes and their companion objects. –  onof Aug 26 '11 at 7:06
    
Because this would be too much boiler plate code? ;-) Can you please provide an example? –  Sven Jacobs Aug 26 '11 at 7:08
    
answer updated. –  onof Aug 26 '11 at 7:10
    
Thanks! And I don't need an unapply() because case f : File => matches on the class of the object? –  Sven Jacobs Aug 26 '11 at 7:17
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Make these two case class extends a common trait which define it interface and it should work.

BTW, you need an identifier before the type clause in case statement.

trait Resource {
    val uri: String
}

case class File(uri : String) extends Resource
case class Folder(uri : String) extends Resource

val arr = Array[Resource](File("test"), Folder("test2"))

arr.foreach { r : Resource => r match {
  case s: File => println("It's a file")
  case s: Folder => println("It's a folder")
}}
share|improve this answer
    
This works however the uri property and getter methods are stored in both File and Folder(duplicate). I was hoping to have some clean code like the Java example above (I've updated my question). –  Sven Jacobs Aug 26 '11 at 6:59
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At least this compiles:

abstract class Resource(val uri : String)

case class File(override val uri : String) extends Resource(uri)
case class Folder(override val uri : String) extends Resource(uri)

I didn't check if it does "The Right Thing" (TM), though.

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Nope, it doesn't do "The Right Thing" :( Already tried it. This will generate new getter methods for uri in File and Folder. –  Sven Jacobs Aug 26 '11 at 6:33
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