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I have a class that contains a vector:

class Foo {
  typdef std::vector<int> Vec;
  Vec m_kids;
  void addKids(Vec::const_iterator begin, 
               Vec::const_iterator end) {
    m_kids.insert(m_kids.end(), begin, end);
  }
};

Is there any way to allow the following concise function calls? (Maybe by changing the addKids function above?)

int main() {
  Foo foo;
  foo.addKids(23,51,681);             // these...
  foo.addKids(3,6,1,4,88,2,4,-2,101); // ...would be nice?!
}

I suspect you can do it with C++0x vector initializer lists? But unfortunately, I cannot use C++0x. I can use Boost, though, if that helps.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can do this:

Foo foo;
foo << 3, 6, 1, 4, 88, 2, 4, -2, 101; //inserts all!

For that you've to overloaded << and , operators, as:

class Foo {
  typdef std::vector<int> Vec;
  Vec m_kids;
public:
  Foo& operator<<(int item) {
    m_kids.push_back(item); return *this;
  }
  Foo& operator,(int item) {
    m_kids.push_back(item); return *this;
  }
};

Once you implement this, then you can also write:

foo << 3 << 6 << 1 << 4 << 88 << 2 << 4 << -2 << 101; //inserts all!

Even this,

foo, 3, 6, 1, 4, 88, 2, 4, -2, 101; //inserts all!

Or mix both as:

foo << 3, 6, 1 << 4, 88, 2 << 4 << -2, 101; //inserts all!

//and this too!
foo,3 << 6, 1 << 4, 88, 2 << 4 << -2, 101; //inserts all!

All are same!

But mixing doesn't look good. My preference is the very first one!

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1  
That is clever! Overloading operator, was just for compability with his desired syntax I guess? As you've written it, foo << 3 << 6 ... would work, right? –  carlpett Aug 26 '11 at 6:53
    
@carlpett: Yes. –  Nawaz Aug 26 '11 at 6:57
    
+1 This is one approach present in the boost::assign library, I don't like it, but just as a matter of taste (It is the overloading of operator, that I dislike). Alternatively, the CORBA mapping for C++ uses overloads of operator=<< for an similar purpose, just as ugly (if not more) than the <<, but less likely to be confused with insertion into a stream. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 26 '11 at 9:20

Not 100% the same syntax, but check out boost's list_of: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_47_0/libs/assign/doc/index.html#list_of

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I'm not aware of any boost functionality that does this (most likely just because I haven't seen it yet, "boost has it" is almost an axoim...), but you could define a variadic function that does it. It'd look something like this:

void addKids(int N, ...) {
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, N);
    for(int i = 0; i < N; ++i) {
        int val = va_arg(args, int);
        m_kids.push_back(val);
    }
    va_end(args);
}
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1  
Just a remark, the syntax won't be exactly the same, since N is the number of elements. So, for your examples, it'd be foo.addKids(3, 23,51,681); and foo.addKids(9,3,6,1,4,88,2,4,-2,101); –  carlpett Aug 26 '11 at 6:48
    
While I know variadics aren't exactly good, modern c++, it does work... -1 for not kosher? –  carlpett Aug 26 '11 at 6:51
    
Another limitation of this approach is that the variable arguments in C++03 can only be used with fundamental types (and only a subset of them, IIRC) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 26 '11 at 9:22
    
Fundamental types, such as ints, as was asked for. I wholeheartedly agree that using va_* isn't the optimal solution from many points of view, but it does solve the problem as stated, and does it with minimal change of syntax from what was desired. That said, I'd probably ditch similar syntax for all the niceities of overloading operator<< as Nawaz proposed. –  carlpett Aug 26 '11 at 9:36

If you change your iterator types

template<typename T>
void addKids(T begin, T end)
{
  m_kids.insert(m_kids.end(), begin, end);
}

then you can at least do this:

int kids={1,2,3,4};
foo.addKids(kids,kids+4);

Which seems pretty concise.

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