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Is it bad practice to use the instanceof operator in the following context?

public interface IWriter {
    public abstract void write(Dto dto);
}

public abstract class Dto {
    private long id;
    public void setId(long id) {this.id = id;}
    public long getId() {return id;}
}

public class DtoA extends Dto {
   ...
}

public class DtoB extends Dto {
   ...
}

public class MyWriterA implements IWriter {
   @Override
   public void writer(Dto dto) {
     if (!(dto instanceof DtoA))
        return;
     ...
   }
}

public class MyWriterB implements IWriter {
   @Override
   public void writer(Dto dto) {
     if (!(dto instanceof DtoB))
        return;
     ...
   }
}

There is a lot of myths about the use of that operator and I am not completely sure that what I am doing is not bunk.

I have a lot of different writer implementations which I want to combine in one interface. The problem is not every DTO is applicable for every writer. In my actual code there is a deep hierarchy of DTOs, which extend DtoA and DtoB, and either the hierarchy branch of DtoA or DtoB is applicable for a writer, but only in a few cases both.

Should I avoid using the abstract class Dto as argument for the abstract write(Dto dto) method?

EDIT: Please read the comments on the accepted answer.

share|improve this question
    
I changed the title to be a bit more descriptive ... if this did not hit your intent, feel free to edit again. – Paŭlo Ebermann Aug 27 '11 at 17:08
up vote 3 down vote accepted

How is the code calling the IWriter? Presumably you've got to determine the type up there too? In which case you already know what kind of writer you need. You're already dispatching on the basis of Type.

Your writers are not really substitutable WriterA only does As and so on. In which case you're not gaining anything by claiming they are in an inheritance hierarchy.

share|improve this answer
    
I have a IWriter object (I don't know the exact type at runtime) and I read DTOs (their type is also unkown) from a queue but only the DTOs of the correct type should be written, so they are actually in a hierarchy... – Tobson Aug 26 '11 at 8:34
1  
OK, so you're just throwing all the DTOs at a writer and he ignores the ones he doesn't understand. In which case I think the Writer is responsible for his "rules" and hence your instanceOf is actually just fine. – djna Aug 26 '11 at 8:44
    
Thx now I understand that this is a case when it is necessary to use instanceof, as all other approaches result in different behavior. – Tobson Aug 26 '11 at 9:22

Sometimes there's no getting around using instanceof - there is no need to feel shame.

Typing IWriter may help:

public interface IWriter<T extends Dto> {
    public abstract void write(T dto);
}

then

public class MyWriterA implements IWriter<DtoA> {
   @Override
   public void writer(DtoA dto) {
     // No need for instanceof, because it can't be anything else
     ...
   }
}

Perhaps a combination of such typing and Brian Agnew's worthy answer would do the trick.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I do not know very much about generics but your approach sounds most interesting. Could I pass any object that implements Dto to MyWriterA#writer(Dto?) or would that result in a compiler error? – Tobson Aug 26 '11 at 8:59
    
Ok checked it out...it results in a compiler error :) This way to handle it is really cool but not appropriate to what I need, as it does something different than my sample code... – Tobson Aug 26 '11 at 9:19
    
Maybe post more context of how you would call/use it (without posting too much code :) ). We could probably help your more. – Bohemian Aug 26 '11 at 9:24

Have you looked at double-dispatch or the Visitor pattern ?

Essentially your Writer and DTO objects would mediate to call the correct methods e.g.

public void writer(Dto dto) {
   dto.doSomething(writer);
}

and the doSomething() method called would depend on the type of the Dto. Your Dto object would implement a version for MyWriterA/B.

Using instanceOf isn't unavoidable, but is often a design smell, indicating that something isn't right, or could be done better.

share|improve this answer
    
Gonna do it right now :) – Tobson Aug 26 '11 at 8:16
    
+1 This would be my preferred approach. – Mikaveli Aug 26 '11 at 8:27
    
Brian, please elaborate. What's signature of that doSomething() method? Will there be a writerA version and a writerB version? That writer method is a method of say writerA, suppose it is called with a B, then we call the doSomething(writerA) method of a B? Surely not? – djna Aug 26 '11 at 8:30
    
Ok thats a very interesting pattern. I'm not sure if I'm getting it right I think it would result in different behavior than my code because objects of the wrong type would not be ignored, they would be written. What would the doSomething() method do exactly? – Tobson Aug 26 '11 at 8:59

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