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Can anyone recomend me a simple web UI prototyping tool, so I could quicky prototype the look of a my web site.

I have tried to use MS Visio for this, but found it very "user un-friendly".

What I really need is to be able quicky sketch the layout of the page, put some links, images and buttons on in, play a little bit with a colors (CSS), and it would be great it this tool could support navigation between the pages - but it is not essential.

I would rather consider a low-cost or an open-source solution, since I am not a web designer and not going to use that tool on a daily basis.

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seem like duplicate: stackoverflow.com/q/5672/379641 –  Gan Oct 19 '10 at 9:08
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closed as not constructive by casperOne Jul 26 '12 at 13:36

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21 Answers

Though this area seems to be really fragmented and no clear low-cost or open-source solution exists, there are some worthy contenders:

  1. Protoshare is really easy and effortless for getting a basic UI mockup up and running. It is free for one project use.
  2. Balsamiq is more of a UI mockup tool rather than for prototyping. You can create UI screen mockups very quickly with a wide range of UI elements. Unfortunately, they don't have support for cross-page navigation, clicking, maintaining state, etc. It is free (with a 5 min nag screen) but also incorporates with Eclipse and other IDEs.
  3. Axure is one of the best tools for UI prototyping and thus very expensive.

I'd recommend starting out with Protoshare with their free trial. If all you need are UI sketches/mockups, Balsamiq is really the best free option out there.

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sweet- i've been looking for this for a while now. Thanks for the links ! –  sthg Apr 6 '09 at 3:55
    
I was recently introduced to Axure and was very impressed. $589. I'd not call Axure 'very expensive'...but certainly is not cheap. –  Stu Thompson Apr 6 '09 at 4:56
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Balsamiq is the name of the company - the product is called Balsamiq Mockups. –  Wayne Koorts May 7 '09 at 3:35
    
Has Joel not mentioned Balsamiq on the podcast? –  Lucas Jones Jul 11 '09 at 20:27
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It appears that Protshare doesn't have a "free for one project" anymore... protoshare.com/sign-up –  Frank V Dec 6 '09 at 22:30
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Take a look at The Pencil Project, available both as a standalone application and a Firefox addon. It's surprisingly useful. However, it tends to get really slow when you start having a full GUI.

Still in active development, latest version released in october 2012.

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WireframeSketcher is a tool that helps quickly create wireframes, mockups and prototypes for desktop, web and mobile applications. It comes both as a standalone version and as a plug-in for Eclipse IDEs. It has some distinctive features like storyboards, components, linking and vector PDF export. Among supported IDEs are are Aptana, Flash Builder, Zend Studio and Rational Application Developer.

Sample WireframeSketcher mockup

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Really a great tool, easy to use and just works. Thanks –  harry Apr 28 '11 at 16:02
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Thank You very much. That's it! –  marioosh Nov 4 '11 at 12:41
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I really like Mockingbird.

  • Web based, (no flash)
  • There is a free version
  • It is fast, light weight, and simple
  • It has all the widgets you can dream of
  • You can do real time collaboration

Mockingbird

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I use several solutions:

  1. Pencil and paper - This is a good place to start usually. If I'm talking to the client over the phone, I will usually jot down notes and do a rough sketch of what the client wants. Likewise, it's a good idea to have a few blank sheets of paper around when getting together with the client for communal brainstorming sessions.
  2. A white board - along with different colored dry-erase markers might work even better. To me this is the most natural way to come up with a rough layout of a site interface. A quick drawing is the best way to communicate UI/layout ideas. And a white board facilitates brainstorming and collaboration very nicely.
  3. Photoshop/Illustrator - or any other graphics program. Illustrator actually works quite well for creating layout mock-ups. You have access to useful tools like vector shapes, type objects, rulers, smart guides, etc. And after tweaking the layout to your liking in Photoshop, you can just chop it all up and you've got images ready for use on your site.

I've never really found a need for anything beyond this. IMHO, using a specialized "prototyping tool" between paper/white board and creating the actual design in Illustrator/Photoshop is unnecessary. I couldn't justify paying for a commercial service that really adds nothing useful to my design process.

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+1 for the Pencil and Paper. I go pencil to Balsamiq, personally. –  Travis Apr 6 '09 at 6:59
    
Another vote for the Pencil and Paper! It's so much faster than any method I am aware of that you can use to input data into a computer. (Even a tablet isn't as responsive as a good old pencil...) –  Steve Harrison Apr 14 '09 at 8:07
    
If you can't afford Illustrator, Inkscape (inkscape.org) is a brilliant FOSS equivalent. Don't be put off by the low version number - the jump from 0.45 to 0.46 is more like 0.1 to 0.4! –  Lucas Jones Jul 11 '09 at 20:28
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We have spent quite some time selecting from this category of tools lately for a large project, so have some current experience with most of them

Balsamiq and iPlotz are getting all the attention lately and they are both very good tools for simple sketchy" look mockups, and while we found the sketchy/hard-drawn look a HUGE benefit (well written about elsewhere) we also wanted more interactive demo features.

We then found FlairBuilder and it does what the others do just as quickly (also an AIR app) except that it goes much further (if you want it to) and creates interactive demos that actually run ie. the controls are all real windows controls.

My main issue was that is doesnt have a "sketchy" look, and after a few pleasant exhanges with the sole developer he has agreed to add this as a theme which I believe is almost done.

Why having a sketchy/pencil theme its so valuable is causing reviewers to not focus on detail (colors/fonts/alignment etc) and more on function & concepts, as well as to stop manager thinking that its "almost done" :-)

See the history comment with the developer here

getsatisfaction.com/.../pencil_sketch_styles_as_used_by_balsamiq_and_iplotz

We own licences for iPlotz, Mockups, Axure and now FlairBuilder, and find we use FlairBuilder the most now.

But each to their own!

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I use vector painting tools like Inkscape. Its free and available on Linux and Windows. It uses the standard SVG format so its not a problem to share it with other people using Freehand or other vector design tools. If the mock-up is ready, its easy to export some parts as a image (png or other supported formats) for further processing (cutting the image in smaller parts) with Gimp or Photoshop or use it directly inside the page.

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Can you recommend any libraries with ui stencils? –  Mike Chaliy Jan 6 at 9:57
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We just use the same IDEs that we use for the actual development. For instance, if you, like some designers I know, already use Dreamweaver you already know how to set colors, styles and add objects to the page. You can set dummy text and then link pages together. If you are a developer using Eclipse, or VisualStudio or some other IDE it is fairly easy to do the same thing.

My main point is, why try to learn a different tool if your main tool can fill the need.

I have seen presentation software like PowerPoint used for this, but I have not been satisfied with the results.

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The reason is because non-technical people will get the mock-up confused with an actual screenshot of the finished product. Balsamiq for example completely fortifies the line between mock-up and production UI by the hand drawn style it uses. –  Jason Punyon Apr 6 '09 at 4:12
    
+1 Jason Punyon's comment. Even if you explicitly tell users what they are looking at is a mockup, they don't get it. Furthermore, prototyping tools do other neat tricks, like annotations. –  Stu Thompson Apr 6 '09 at 4:49
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I have found yesterday a quite nice web UI design tool based on Dojo Toolkit widgets.

http://maqetta.org/

"Maqetta was developed by IBM and later donated to the Dojo Foundation as an open source project" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maqetta)

I have used preview version 6 - it looks very promising :)

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I found iPlotz online as well, seems to be an interesting alternative to Protoshare. I played with the demo for a while and it reminded me a lot of Balsamiq in that the mockups are more static and hand-drawn. It's free for 1 project with 5 pages, and then it's $15/month or $99/year, which seems a lot less than Protoshare's entry-level plan of $29/month for a personal plan.

If you had a team of 5, I think Protoshare would be $1,188/year and iPlotz would be $295/year.

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iPlotz is online and is free. It is very useful for quick mockups. Thanks for sharing. –  sul4bh Aug 10 '10 at 16:56
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ive written a white paper which discusses the pros and cons of five different tools (visio, frontpage, etc):

http://pm4web.blogspot.com/2008/10/wireframes-and-mockups-part-1.html

for business-presence websites i tend to use photoshop since it presents a polished design. but i only create one page to establish the look and feel.

if its a custom app for a client, i using visio at the moment. mainly because i like to put in tech notes in a sidebar.

LM

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You can also try my.origramy - a free online service that can be used also for website prototyping purposes. P.S. Here's an example of a web page prototype. enter image description here

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http://protomoto.com is a great interactive overview of prototyping/wireframing tools for different devices, including recent tools such as Codiqa, Tiggzi, and HotGloo.

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This may be lower level than what you're looking for, but if you're looking at Photoshop/Illustrator you may be interested in using the images at http://cameronmoll.com/archives/2006/12/gridding_the_960/ as your background layer.

This can give you a baseline for splitting header/column elements and assist in lining up the elements of your mock-up.

Furthermore if you're using a WYSIWYG HTML editor solution you can make this a background image of your webpage in the CSS.

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ForeUI is worth trying out.

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ForeUI is not completely free though, it only offers free 15-day trial. –  Gan Oct 19 '10 at 7:59
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Phillip Cloud Sep 5 '13 at 21:01
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  slfan Sep 5 '13 at 21:07
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Try out Sketch Lab. It is made for simplicity and ease of use, so it should be perfect for you.

Disclosure: I am the developer.

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Try Handcraft. Sign up for a free account, walk through the tutorial and include Google Web Fonts. It allows you to quickly use CSS3 fonts of any choice, or use web-based built in ones. It even has code completion for CSS that shows the actual fonts families.

[Update: Oh and you when you use Firebug to fiddle with the CSS you can save your changes with Handcraft too]

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Just an extension for google chrome.

Design extension

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As of 1-Apr-2009, Microsoft Office SharePoint Designer is free. Although it has a lot more capability than just web page layout, it does use the same designer that Visual Studio 2008 uses. This means it can not only be used to design HTML, but also ASP.NET controls.

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