Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have faced some problem in this case can you please your ideas.

main()
{
char *p=NULL;
p=(char *)malloc(2000 * sizeof(char));
printf("size of p = %d\n",sizeof (p));
}

In this program Its print the 4 that (char *) value,but i need how many bytes allocated for that.

share|improve this question
    
    
You (and the answerers) can omit sizeof(char) It is by definition always 1. –  glglgl Aug 26 '11 at 8:55
    
You should not typecast the result of malloc in C. stackoverflow.com/search?q=typecast+result+malloc –  Lundin Aug 26 '11 at 8:57
    
possible duplicate of How can I get the size of an array from a pointer in C? –  Bo Persson Aug 26 '11 at 11:29

5 Answers 5

It is impossible to know how much memory was allocated by just the pointer. doing sizeof (p) will get the size of the pointer variable p which it takes at compile time, and which is the size of the pointer. That is, the memory the pointer variable takes to store the pointer variable p. Inside p the starting address of the memory block is stored.

Once you allocate some memory with malloc it will return the starting address of the memory block, but the end of the block cannot be found from it, as there is no terminator for a block. You define the end of the block therefore you need to identify it by any means, so store it somewhere. Therefore you need to preserve the block length somewhere to know where the block which is pointed to by p ends.

Note: Although the memory allocation structure keeps track of allocated and unallocated blocks, therefore we can know the allocated memory block length from these structures, but these structures are not available to be used by the users, unless any library function provides them. Therefore a code using such feature is not portable (pointed by @Rudy Velthuis) . Therefore it is the best to keep track of the structure yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
While I agree with what you wrote, there is obviously a way, since free() must know the size too. But there is not always a publicly accessible and certainly no portable way. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 26 '11 at 9:00
    
yes, free must know, but it is dependent on the internal structure and the algorithm being used. Therefore "it is impossible" is an overstatement. –  phoxis Aug 26 '11 at 9:02

You cannot use the sizeof in this case, since p is a pointer, not an array, but since you allocate it, you already know:

main()
{
    size_t arr_size = 2000;
    char *p=NULL;
    p=malloc(arr_size * sizeof(char));
    printf("size of p = %d\n",arr_size);
}

Edit - If the malloc fails to allocate the size you wanted, it won't give you a pointer to a smaller buffer, but it will return NULL.

share|improve this answer
1  
And if you didn't allocate it, there is simply no (standard) way to find out how large the allocation was. –  Stuart Cook Aug 26 '11 at 8:43
1  
Where did you studied it? –  MByD Aug 26 '11 at 8:46
    
You should not typecast the result of malloc in C. stackoverflow.com/search?q=typecast+result+malloc –  Lundin Aug 26 '11 at 8:57
    
@Lundin - that's true, this is a habit from writing C code in C++ environment –  MByD Aug 26 '11 at 9:39

You need to keep track of it in a variable if you want to know it for later:

char *p = NULL;
int sizeofp = 2000*sizeof(char);
p = (char *)malloc(sizeofp);
printf("size of p = %d\n",sizeofp);
share|improve this answer
    
You should not typecast the result of malloc in C. stackoverflow.com/search?q=typecast+result+malloc –  Lundin Aug 26 '11 at 8:56
    
Some compilers complain if you do not cast the result of malloc to a pointer type, especially if you are casting to a struct pointer or a typedef custom pseudo type. If you are OCD and cannot stand any feedback warnings from a compiler then you may wish to silence such warnings with a cast. –  Chris Reid Mar 21 at 23:51

There is no portable way but for windows:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <malloc.h>

#if defined( _MSC_VER ) || defined( __int64 ) /* for VisualC++ or MinGW/gcc */    
#define howmanybytes(ptr) ((unsigned long)_msize(ptr))
#else
#error no known way
#endif

int main()
{
  char *x=malloc(1234);

  printf( "%lu", howmanybytes(x) );

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Although it may be possible that some operating system allows you to determine the size of an allocated buffer, it wouldn't be a standard C function and you should be looking at your operating system's own system calls for this (provided they do allow you access to that).

However, if there are many places that you need to know the size of your allocated memory, the cleanest way you could do it is to keep the size next to the pointer. That is:

struct pointer
{
    size_t size;
    void *p;
};

Then every time you malloc the pointer, you write down the size in the size field also. The problem with this method however is that you have to cast the pointer every time you use it. If you were in C++, if would have suggested using template classes. However, in this case also it's not hard, just create as many structs as the types you have. So for example

struct charPtr
{
    size_t size;
    char *p;
};
struct intPtr
{
    size_t size;
    int *p;
};
struct objectPtr
{
    size_t size;
    struct object *p;
};

Given similar names, once you define the pointer, you don't need extra effort (such as casting) to access the array. An example of usage is:

struct intPtr array;
array.p = (int *)malloc(1000*sizeof(int));
array.size = array.p?1000:0;
...
for (i = 0; i < array.size; ++i)
    printf("%s%d", i?" ":"", array.p[i]);
printf("\n");
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.