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I have a baffling problem with an iPhone 4 OpenGL ES app that I have been trying to tackle on and off for a couple of months now and have hit a dead end despite some really useful and tantalising tips and suggestions on this site.

I am writing a 3d game which simply draws blocks and allows the user to move them around into various arrangements and the bulk of the app is written in C++.

My problem is that I am trying to use GLuUnproject which I found source code for here:

http://webcvs.freedesktop.org/mesa/Mesa/src/glu/mesa/project.c?view=markup

to interpret the 3d point (and hence the block) selected by the user in order to move and rotate it which I convered to floating point rather than double precision.

Please note that I have compared this source to other versions on the net and it appears to be consistent.

I use the following code to get the ray vector:

Ray RenderingEngine::GetRayVector( vec2 winPos ) const
{
    // Get the last matrices used
    glGetFloatv( GL_MODELVIEW_MATRIX, __modelview ); 
    glGetFloatv( GL_PROJECTION_MATRIX, __projection );
    glGetIntegerv( GL_VIEWPORT, __viewport );

    // Flip the y coordinate
    winPos.y = (float)__viewport[3] - winPos.y;

    // Create vectors to be set
    vec3 nearPoint;
    vec3 farPoint;
    Ray rayVector;

    //Retrieving position projected on near plan
    gluUnProject( winPos.x, winPos.y , 0, 
                 __modelview, __projection, __viewport, 
                  &nearPoint.x, &nearPoint.y, &nearPoint.z);

    //Retrieving position projected on far plan
    gluUnProject( winPos.x, winPos.y,  1, 
                 __modelview, __projection, __viewport, 
                  &farPoint.x, &farPoint.y, &farPoint.z);

    rayVector.nearPoint = nearPoint;
    rayVector.farPoint = farPoint;

    //Return the ray vector
    return rayVector;
}

The vector code for tracing out the returned ray from the near plane to the far plane is straightforward and I find that blocks near the bottom of the screen are correctly identified but as one moves up the screen there seems to be an increasing discrepancy in the reported y-values and the expected y values for the points selected.

I have also tried using GLuProject to manually check which screen coordinates are generated for my world coordinates as follows:

vec3 RenderingEngine::GetScreenCoordinates( vec3 objectPos ) const
{

    // Get the last matrices used
    glGetFloatv( GL_MODELVIEW_MATRIX, __modelview ); 
    glGetFloatv( GL_PROJECTION_MATRIX, __projection );
    glGetIntegerv( GL_VIEWPORT, __viewport );

    vec3 winPos;

    gluProject(objectPos.x, objectPos.y, objectPos.z , 
                   __modelview, __projection, __viewport, 
                   &winPos.x, &winPos.y, &winPos.z);

    // Swap the y value
    winPos.y = (float)__viewport[3] - winPos.y;

    return winPos;
}  

Again, the results are consistent with the ray tracing approach in that the GLuProjected y coordinate gets increasingly wrong as the user clicks higher up the screen.

For example, when the clicked position directly reported by the touchesBegan event is (246,190) the calculated position is (246, 215), a y discrepancy of 25.

When the clicked position directly reported by the touchesBegan event is (246,398) the calculated position is (246, 405), a y discrepancy of 7.

The x coordinate seems to be spot on.

I notice that the layer.bounds.size.height is reported as 436 when the viewport height is set to 480 (the full screen height). The layer bounds width is reported as 320 which is also the width of the viewport.

The value of 436 seems to be fixed no matter what viewport size I use or whether I display the status screen at the top of the window.

Have tried setting the bounds.size.height to 480 before the following call:

[my_context
        renderbufferStorage:GL_RENDERBUFFER
        fromDrawable: eaglLayer];

But this seems to be ignored and the height is later reported as 436 in the call:

glGetRenderbufferParameterivOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES,
                                GL_RENDERBUFFER_HEIGHT_OES, &height);

I have seen some discussion of the difference in points and pixels and the possible need for scaling but have struggled to use that information usefully since these hinted that the difference was due to the retina display resolution of the iPhone 4 and that different scaling would be required for the simulator and the actual device. However, as far as I can tell the simulator and device are behaving consistently.

30-Aug-2011 As not getting any feedback on this one - is there more information I can supply to make the question more tractable?

31-Aug-2011 OpenGL setup and display code as follows:

- (id) initWithCoder:(NSCoder*)coder
{    
    if ((self = [super initWithCoder:coder]))
    {

        // Create OpenGL friendly layer to draw in
        CAEAGLLayer* eaglLayer = (CAEAGLLayer*) self.layer;
        eaglLayer.opaque = YES;

        // eaglLayer.bounds.size.width and eaglLayer.bounds.size.height are 
        // always 320 and 436 at this point

        EAGLRenderingAPI api = kEAGLRenderingAPIOpenGLES1;
        m_context = [[EAGLContext alloc] initWithAPI:api];

        // check have a context
        if (!m_context || ![EAGLContext setCurrentContext:m_context]) {
            [self release];
            return nil;
        }

        glGenRenderbuffersOES(1, &m_colorRenderbuffer);
        glBindRenderbufferOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES, m_colorRenderbuffer);

        [m_context
            renderbufferStorage:GL_RENDERBUFFER
            fromDrawable: eaglLayer];

        UIScreen *scr = [UIScreen mainScreen];
        CGRect rect = scr.applicationFrame;
        int width = CGRectGetWidth(rect);    // Always 320
        int height = CGRectGetHeight(rect);  // Always 480 (status bar not displayed)

        // Initialise the main code
        m_applicationEngine->Initialise(width, height);

            // This is the key c++ code invoked in Initialise call shown here indented

            // Setup viewport
            LowerLeft = ivec2(0,0);
            ViewportSize = ivec2(width,height);

            // Code to create vertex and index buffers not shown here
            // …

            // Extract width and height from the color buffer.
            int width, height;
            glGetRenderbufferParameterivOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES,
                                            GL_RENDERBUFFER_WIDTH_OES, &width);
            glGetRenderbufferParameterivOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES,
                                            GL_RENDERBUFFER_HEIGHT_OES, &height);

            // Create a depth buffer that has the same size as the color buffer.
            glGenRenderbuffersOES(1, &m_depthRenderbuffer);
            glBindRenderbufferOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES, m_depthRenderbuffer);
            glRenderbufferStorageOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES, GL_DEPTH_COMPONENT16_OES,
                                     width, height);

            // Create the framebuffer object.
            GLuint framebuffer;
            glGenFramebuffersOES(1, &framebuffer);
            glBindFramebufferOES(GL_FRAMEBUFFER_OES, framebuffer);
            glFramebufferRenderbufferOES(GL_FRAMEBUFFER_OES, GL_COLOR_ATTACHMENT0_OES,
                                         GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES, m_colorRenderbuffer);
            glFramebufferRenderbufferOES(GL_FRAMEBUFFER_OES, GL_DEPTH_ATTACHMENT_OES,
                                     GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES, m_depthRenderbuffer);
            glBindRenderbufferOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES, m_colorRenderbuffer);


            // Set up various GL states.
            glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
            glEnableClientState(GL_NORMAL_ARRAY);
            glEnable(GL_LIGHTING);
            glEnable(GL_LIGHT0);
            glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);

        // ...Back in initiWithCoder

        // Do those things which need to happen when the main code is reset
        m_applicationEngine->Reset();

            // This is the key c++ code invoked in Reset call shown here indented

            // Set initial camera position where
            // eye=(0.7,8,-8), m_target=(0,4,0), CAMERA_UP=(0,-1,0)
            m_main_camera = mat4::LookAt(eye, m_target, CAMERA_UP); 


        // ...Back in initiWithCoder
        [self drawView: nil];
        m_timestamp = CACurrentMediaTime();

        // Create timer object that allows application to synchronise its 
        // drawing to the refresh rate of the display.
        CADisplayLink* displayLink;
        displayLink = [CADisplayLink displayLinkWithTarget:self
                                 selector:@selector(drawView:)];

        [displayLink addToRunLoop:[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop]
                 forMode:NSDefaultRunLoopMode];
    }
    return self;
}



- (void) drawView: (CADisplayLink*) displayLink
{

    if (displayLink != nil) {

        // Invoke main rendering code
        m_applicationEngine->Render();

            // This is the key c++ code invoked in Render call shown here indented

            // Do the background
            glClearColor(1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1);
            glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);

            // A set of objects are provided to this method
            // for each one (called visual below) do the following:

            // Set the viewport transform.
            glViewport(LowerLeft.x, LowerLeft.y, ViewportSize.x, ViewportSize.y);

            // Set the model view and projection transforms
            // Frustum(T left, T right, T bottom, T top, T near, T far)
            float h = 4.0f * size.y / size.x;
            mat4 modelview = visual->Rotation * visual->Translation * m_main_camera;
            mat4 projection = mat4::Frustum(-1.5, 1.5, h/2, -h/2, 4, 14);

            // Load the model view matrix and initialise
            glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
            glLoadIdentity();
            glLoadMatrixf(modelview.Pointer());

            glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
            glLoadIdentity();
            glLoadMatrixf(projection.Pointer());

            // Draw the surface - code not shown
            // …    

        // ...Back in drawView
        [m_context presentRenderbuffer:GL_RENDERBUFFER];
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
How do you end up with a CAEAGLLayer on screen? If you've built a UIView around it, what frame does that have? 436 is suspiciously similar to 426 - are you sure your view or code doesn't somewhere assume or try to force a 4:3 aspect ratio? – Tommy Aug 30 '11 at 14:32
    
@Tommy. Thanks for your question. I have a custom class called GLView which has the methods added above (some of the code invoked from function calls is shown inline to make it easier to follow). – Braunius Aug 31 '11 at 7:21

When the view that holds renderer is resized, it will be notified in this way:

- (void) layoutSubviews
{
  [renderer resizeFromLayer:(CAEAGLLayer*)self.layer];
  [self drawView:nil];
}

- (BOOL) resizeFromLayer:(CAEAGLLayer *)layer
{   
    // Allocate color buffer backing based on the current layer size
  glBindRenderbufferOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES, colorRenderBuffer);
  [context renderbufferStorage:GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES fromDrawable:layer];
  glGetRenderbufferParameterivOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES, GL_RENDERBUFFER_WIDTH_OES, &backingWidth);
  glGetRenderbufferParameterivOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES, GL_RENDERBUFFER_HEIGHT_OES, &backingHeight);

  if (glCheckFramebufferStatusOES(GL_FRAMEBUFFER_OES) != GL_FRAMEBUFFER_COMPLETE_OES)
  {
    NSLog(@"Failed to make complete framebuffer object %x", glCheckFramebufferStatusOES(GL_FRAMEBUFFER_OES));
    return NO;
  }

  [self recreatePerspectiveProjectionMatrix];
  return YES;
}

Notice that perspective matrix should be properly recreated due to view port size has changed. And it will have influence on un-project result.

Related to scale issues:

Inside view initialization get the scale factor:

    CGFloat scale = 1;
    if ([self respondsToSelector:@selector(getContentScaleFactor:)])
    {
        self.contentScaleFactor = [[UIScreen mainScreen] scale];
        scale = self.contentScaleFactor;
    }

The view size is actually virtually the same on standard and retina display, 320px wide, but the rendering layer size will be doubled for the retina, 640px. When converting between opengl renderer space and view space the scale factor should be considered.

Added: Try to change the order for getting and setting width and height parameter inside initialization code:

Instead of this:

    int width = CGRectGetWidth(rect);    // Always 320
    int height = CGRectGetHeight(rect);  // Always 480 (status bar not displayed)

    // Initialise the main code
    m_applicationEngine->Initialise(width, height);

        // This is the key c++ code invoked in Initialise call shown here indented

        // Setup viewport
        LowerLeft = ivec2(0,0);
        ViewportSize = ivec2(width,height);

        // Code to create vertex and index buffers not shown here
        // …

        // Extract width and height from the color buffer.
        int width, height;
        glGetRenderbufferParameterivOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES,
                                        GL_RENDERBUFFER_WIDTH_OES, &width);
        glGetRenderbufferParameterivOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES,
                                        GL_RENDERBUFFER_HEIGHT_OES, &height);

try this order (dont't use the size from view):

        // Code to create vertex and index buffers not shown here
        // …

        // Extract width and height from the color buffer.
        int width, height;
        glGetRenderbufferParameterivOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES,
                                        GL_RENDERBUFFER_WIDTH_OES, &width);
        glGetRenderbufferParameterivOES(GL_RENDERBUFFER_OES,
                                        GL_RENDERBUFFER_HEIGHT_OES, &height);

    // Initialise the main code
    m_applicationEngine->Initialise(width, height);

        // This is the key c++ code invoked in Initialise call shown here indented

        // Setup viewport
        LowerLeft = ivec2(0,0);
        ViewportSize = ivec2(width,height);

Also make sure you have set for the UIController parameter for the full screen layout:

self.wantsFullScreenLayout = YES;

After that, for iphone 4 the width and height should be exactly 640x960, and contentScaleFactor should be 2.

But, notice also that layoutSubviews is the standard UIView function and it is the only place where I am getting the screen size and adjusting projection or frustum matrix.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this feedback but I am not sure how to use it. The viewport size is not changed after initialisation. Perhaps the additional code I have now provided will show better what I am trying to do? I tried adding the scaling code you provided in the initWithCoder method and it always returned 1 but that was because the if statement wasn't satisfied. – Braunius Aug 31 '11 at 7:23
    
Oops. Sorry. I write it from my head. Replace getContentScaleFactor with setContentScaleFactor. I checked in my source. Also look at the my updated comment. – Prcela Aug 31 '11 at 8:11
    
Thanks again - still struggling - apologies. Have included changes to your scaling check and this now gets invoked but returns a value of 1 back to scale. Calculating the width/height as suggested (rather than frame size) seems to have increased the y-descrepancy by 15 for both the test cases I cited. Also put the self.wants... call in the viewWillAppear method but note had already set Status bar is initially hidden in the plist file. I can't see 640*960 anywhere in my debugging or a content scale factor of 2. I just don't understand where the figure of 436 comes from for the backing height. – Braunius Sep 2 '11 at 9:22
    
Thanks again but I have no tracked down the problem and have provided the (embarrassing) answer above. – Braunius Sep 2 '11 at 11:02

Well...am feeling somewhat foolish now...

The problem was that the view I was using was actually 436 pixels high, which I had set eons ago when experimenting with allowing room for a common navigation bar on the main window which I no longer use.

Setting this back to 480 solved the problem.

Apologies to those who looked at this and particularly those who responded.

I am now going to go and put myself out of my misery after months of frustration!

share|improve this answer
    
LOL! :D Good luck! Anyway, for the IOS 4 the content scale factor must be 2 when debugging on retina. See this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/4189745/… – Prcela Sep 2 '11 at 12:09

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