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So, this is not your average 'conditional sort by' question... I have a rather tricky problem here. :-) I want to allow my stored procedure to offer a conditional sort order for the results. Normally this can be done in the following manner:

SELECT *
INTO #ResultsBeforeSubset
FROM
    MyTable
ORDER BY
    CASE WHEN @SortAscending=1 THEN 'SortColumn' END ASC,
    CASE WHEN @SortAscending=0 THEN 'SortColumn' END DESC

I'd like to do a CASE statement around the actual ASC/DESC, but that doesn't work. The reason the above method works is because, when @SortAscending isn't equal to the given value, SQL server translates the CASE statement into the constant NULL. So, if @SortAscending is 0, you effectively have:

ORDER BY
    NULL ASC,
    SortColumn DESC

The first sort expression, then, just does nothing. This works because in a regular SELECT statement you can use constant in an ORDER BY clause.

Trouble is, the time that I'm sorting in my stored proc is during a SELECT statement which contains a windowed function ROW_NUMBER(). I therefore want to put the CASE statement inside its OVER clause, like so:

SELECT *
INTO #ResultsBeforeSubset
FROM (
    SELECT
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
            ORDER BY
                CASE WHEN @SortAscending=1 THEN rowValues.[SortColumn] END ASC,
                CASE WHEN @SortAscending=0 THEN rowValues.[SortColumn] END DESC
        ) AS RowNumber,
        *
    FROM (
        -- UNIONed SELECTs returning rows go here...
    ) rowValues
) rowValuesWithRowNum

Unfortunately, this causes the following error when you run the stored procedure:

Windowed functions do not support constants as ORDER BY clause expressions.

Because this is the clause of a windowed function, the conversion of the CASE statement to the constant NULL is invalid.

Can anyone think of a way that I can conditionally vary the sort order of UNIONed SELECTs, and assign row numbers to each row resulting from these sorted results? I know I could resort to constructing the entire query as a string and execute that as fully dynamic SQL, but I'd rather avoid that if possible.


UPDATE: Looks like the problem wasn't caused by the CASE statement per se, but by the fact that I was using only constant values in the CASE statement's conditional clause. I've started up a new question on this curious behaviour here.

share|improve this question
    
+1 for the well written question. –  Bernhard Hofmann Aug 26 '11 at 11:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could assign row numbers in two directions, and pick one in an outer order by:

select  *
from    (
        select  row_number() over (order by SortColumn) rn1
        ,       row_number() over (order by SortColumn) rn2
        ,       *
        from    @t
        ) as SubQueryAlias
order by
        case when @asc=1 then rn1 end
,       case when @asc=0 then rn2 end desc

Working example at SE Data.

share|improve this answer
    
I already addressed this in the question; this would create a constant inside the windowed function's clause, causing the error I'm getting now. –  Jez Aug 26 '11 at 10:14
    
@Jez: Just checked my original answer, and that too works fine. The problem might be that you're quoting the column name; 'SortColumn' is indeed a constant. –  Andomar Aug 26 '11 at 10:26
    
Ah! Your original answer that you linked above made me wonder why mine wasn't working, and it turns out the problem was not with the CASE statement being there, but the fact that I had been using constants in the CASE statement's conditional clause! This query (I suggest you link it in your answer) shows the issue; uncomment the 2 case statements with int constants in them and the query fails. However when I don't use such constants in the case statement it works fine! Thx. –  Jez Aug 26 '11 at 11:14
    
Actually, this behaviour is curious enough it may warrant further investigation. Logically, if ORDER BY CASE WHEN @MyVar=1 THEN SortColumn END ASC works, surely ORDER BY CASE WHEN 1=1 THEN SortColumn END ASC should too, assuming @MyVar is an int that may evaluate to 1? Yet, the latter causes an error and the former doesn't. And, because the CASE statement may evaluate to NULL if its conditional is false, this should work too, but also gives the error: ORDER BY NULL ASC. –  Jez Aug 26 '11 at 12:25

You could

  • add both an Ascending and Descending column to your intermediate results
  • sort on one of those at the end.

SQL Statement

SELECT  *
INTO    #ResultsBeforeSubset
FROM    (
          SELECT  ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY rowValues.[SortColumn] ASC) AS AscSortColumn
                  , ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY rowValues.[SortColumn] DESC) AS DescSortColumn
                  , *
          FROM    (-- UNIONed SELECTs returning rows go here...
                  ) rowValues
        ) rowValuesWithRowNum
ORDER BY
        CASE  WHEN @SortAscending = 1 
              THEN rowValues.[AscSortColumn] 
              ELSE rowValues.[DescSortColumn] 
        END 
share|improve this answer

If you're going to use these row numbers as part of some other conditional logic, maybe something like this would work:

CASE WHEN @SortAscending=1 THEN COUNT(*) OVER() + 1 ELSE 0 END +
(CASE WHEN @SortAscending=1 THEN -1 ELSE 1 END *
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY SortColumn DESC)) as RowNumber

This can even be extended so that if you're using PARTITION clauses, it continues to work so long as both OVER() expressions use the same PARTITION clauses.

share|improve this answer

You could use constants if you wrap them in a SELECT, such as:

OVER( ORDER BY (SELECT NULL) )

So in your case you should be able to do:

SELECT
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
        ORDER BY
            (SELECT CASE WHEN @SortAscending=1 THEN rowValues.[SortColumn] END) ASC,
            (SELECT CASE WHEN @SortAscending=0 THEN rowValues.[SortColumn] END) DESC
    ) AS RowNumber, 
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, worked a charm. –  Tahir Hassan Jul 11 at 9:32
DECLARE @sign int = -1;
IF @SortAscending = 0 SET @sign = -1;

SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY RowNumber) AS RN,
    *
INTO #ResultsBeforeSubset
FROM (
    SELECT
        @sign * ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY rowValues.[SortColumn]) AS RowNumber,
        *
    FROM MyTable
) rowValuesWithRowNum
ORDER BY RN

--DECLARE @sign int = 1;
--IF @SortAscending = 0 SET @sign = -1;
--
--SELECT *
--INTO #ResultsBeforeSubset
--FROM (
--    SELECT
--        @sign * ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY rowValues.[SortColumn] AS RowNumber,
--        *
--    FROM MyTable
--) rowValuesWithRowNum
--ORDER BY RowNumber;
share|improve this answer
    
Again, this nearly does what I want, but the resulting RowNumbers are going to be negatives (eg. -10 .. -1) instead of positives (eg. 1 .. 10), if @SortAscending is 0. –  Jez Aug 26 '11 at 10:41
    
How about this version? –  AlexK Aug 26 '11 at 10:57

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