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Once upon a time, there was a file in my project that I would now like to be able to get.

The problem is I have no idea of when have I deleted it.

How can I locate the specific commit when this file existed?

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Similar question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/7093602/… –  eckes Aug 26 '11 at 11:04
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4 Answers 4

up vote 172 down vote accepted

If you know the path the file was at, you can do this:

git log --all -- <path-to-file>

This should show a list of commits in all branches which touched that file. Then, you can find the version of the file you want, and display it with...

git show <SHA> -- <path-to-file>

(or restore it into your working copy with git checkout <SHA> -- <path-to-file>)

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I tried git log -- /path/to/file and there was no output... :-( –  Pedro Morte Rolo Aug 26 '11 at 10:48
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Did you change /path/to/file to be the actual path? –  Amber Aug 26 '11 at 10:49
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Yes. Of course. –  Pedro Morte Rolo Aug 26 '11 at 10:49
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What if you don't know the exact path? All you know is the filename? –  priestc Nov 16 '12 at 4:09
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@PedroMorteRolo git log -- <path> will have no output when you are on a branch in which the file never existed. You should always use git log --all -- <path>, to make sure you don't miss changes that happened on other branches. The command git log -- <path> can be very dangerous if you have more than one branch and tend to forget paths and branches (like me) and it's also dangerous if you work with other developers. –  hobs Feb 10 at 18:29
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Get a list of the deleted files and copy the full path of the deleted file

git log --diff-filter=D --summary | grep delete

Execute the next command to find commit id of that commit and copy the commit id

git log --all -- FILEPATH

Show diff of deleted file

git show COMMIT_ID -- FILE_PATH

Remember, you can write output to a file using > like

git show COMMIT_ID -- FILE_PATH > deleted.diff
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This is an amazing and comprehensive answer! I didn't know you could feed the log results to grep like this. –  Tyler Jones May 23 at 16:06
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Although I found the path with help of the first step, the second step throws this error: unknown revision or path not in the working tree. –  jvannistelrooy Jun 6 at 13:39
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Try using one of the viewers, such as gitk so that you can browse around the history to find that half remembered file. (use gitk --all if needed for all branches)

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That --all option is critical for both your answer and the accepted answer. –  hobs Feb 10 at 18:30
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Could not edit the accepted response so adding it as an answer here,

to restore the file in git, use the following (note the '^' sign just after the SHA)

git checkout <SHA>^ -- /path/to/file
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I don't understand why you'd want the ^. The file is IN the commit with that SHA...why would you want to walk back another commit from there? –  Tony K. Sep 4 '13 at 16:30
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It's in the commit with that sha as "deleted" which means it still won't exist. You have to go to the commit before that to actually get it back. –  tandrewnichols Sep 11 '13 at 14:07
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@tandrewnichols which just means that you're using the wrong commit SHA - you want the commit for the version of the file you want... which probably isn't the version where the file is deleted. –  Amber Nov 25 '13 at 21:33
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