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I want to display a string type as checkbox on MVC view, but returns it as string type on HTTP post. The problem is that it returns false on HTTP Post. Below is my code:

View:

  @model List<Car>

        foreach(var car in Model){
       bool isFourWheel = false;
        if(bool.TryParse(car.IsFourWheel, out isFourWheel){
        @Html.CheckBox("IsFourWheel", isFourWheel); //need to be rendered as checkbox, but returns string type on HTTP POST
    }
     }

Model:

public class Car
    {
        public string IsFourWheel { get; set; } //bad naming, but it can contain any type, include boolean
    }

Controller:

 public ActionResult Index()
        {


            var cars = new List<Car>(){ new Car(){IsFourWheel = "true"},new Car(){IsFourWheel = "false"} };
            return View(cars);
        }

        [HttpPost]
        public ActionResult Index(List<Car> cars)  **Problem IsFourWheel is false when true is selected **
        {           
            return View(cars);
        }

Any ideal would be very much appreciated.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can try specifying a template name in your helper:

@Html.EditorFor(car => car.IsFourWheel, "CheckBox")

And defining the template to render the data the way you want, in either ~/Views/{YourControllerName}/EditorTemplates/CheckBox.cshtml or ~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/CheckBox.cshtml.

You can find a whole series of post by Brad Wilson on MVC templates here:

Brad Wilson: ASP.NET MVC 2 Templates, Part 1: Introduction

It is for MVC 2, but most concepts still apply to MVC 3 as well (save for the Razor syntax).

Update:

Actually you probably don't need a custom template for this. Try using @Html.CheckBoxFor(car => car.IsFourWheel) instead.

Update 2:

Drop the following template in ~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates:

IsFourWheel.cshtml

@functions {
    private bool IsChecked() {
        if (ViewData.Model == null) return false;
        return Convert.ToBoolean(ViewData.Model, System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    }
}

@Html.CheckBox("", IsChecked(), new { @class = "check-box" })

Then from your view, call it like so:

@Html.EditorFor(model => model.IsFourWheel, "IsFourWheel")

I tested it and binding works in both GET and POST scenarios.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Could you please elaborate on How to implement it on the CheckBox.cshtml. –  Pingpong Aug 26 '11 at 14:57
    
For an example, you could take a look at the default template for boolean fields (what CheckBoxFor renders) in the MVC source code, for example Boolean.ascx, but as I said, unless you're doing something very specific with your IsFourWheels property, you probably don't need a template and can just use @Html.CheckBoxFor(car => car.IsFourWheel) instead. –  Daniel Liuzzi Aug 26 '11 at 15:05
    
Daniel Liuzzi, @Html.CheckBoxFor requires bool type. –  Pingpong Aug 26 '11 at 15:17
    
@Pingpong Yes, my bad. I updated the answer with the template, which work as expected for boolean values stored as strings. –  Daniel Liuzzi Aug 26 '11 at 15:47
    
Thanks. I will use it and see if it works with my implementation. –  Pingpong Aug 26 '11 at 19:53

I think it will be easier, if you add an Id to your model. Just like this
Model:

public class Car
{
    public int CarID { get; set; }
    public string IsFourWheel { get; set; }        
}


View:

@model IEnumerable<Car>
foreach (var car in Model)
{
    if(car.IsFourWheel == "true"){
        <input type="checkbox" name="carID" value="@car.CarID" checked="checked" />
    }
    else
    {
        <input type="checkbox" name="carID" value="@car.CarID" />
    }
}

Controller:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Index(List<int> carID)
{
    //handle selected cars here
    return View();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your advice. I updated my question. I have a collection of cars, which is needed on post. Your current solution can work for single car only. –  Pingpong Aug 26 '11 at 14:30
    
When there are a collection of car, the input tag needs a id/name that allows the model binder to assign the value. –  Pingpong Aug 26 '11 at 15:14
    
i updated my answer, I hope it will help you –  dohaivu Aug 26 '11 at 15:23

You could alter your viewmodel like this:

public class Car
    {
        public string IsFourWheel { get; set; }
        public bool IsFourWheelBool { get { return bool.Parse(IsFourWheel); } }
    }

Your view would look like this:

@Html.EditFor(x => x.IsFourWheelBool);
share|improve this answer
    
that requires change of domain model, which is not the ideal one. –  Pingpong Aug 26 '11 at 14:31
1  
It's usually considered bad design to use your domain models in your views. (stackoverflow.com/questions/4865806/…) It's better to create viewmodels to facilitate your view. With a tool like automapper (automapper.org) it's easy to create viewmodels from domain models. But also creating viewmodels by hand is quite do-able. –  Robin van der Knaap Aug 26 '11 at 15:04
    
Thanks. I knew that. My question is only a simplified example. –  Pingpong Aug 26 '11 at 15:35

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