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Whilst asking another question, I discovered that SQL Server (happens both in 2005 and 2008) seems to have strange inconsistent behaviour when dealing with CASE statements in the clauses of windowed functions. The following code gives an error:

declare @t table (SortColumn int)
insert @t values (1), (2), (3)
declare @asc bit
set @asc = 0

select  row_number() over (order by
            case when 1=1 then SortColumn end asc,
            case when 1=0 then SortColumn end desc) RowNumber
,       *
from    @t

The error is Windowed functions do not support constants as ORDER BY clause expressions. I presume this is because the case statement might evaluate to NULL, which is a constant. As might also be expected, this code gives the same error:

declare @t table (SortColumn int)
insert @t values (1), (2), (3)
declare @asc bit
set @asc = 0

select  row_number() over (order by
            NULL asc,
            NULL desc) RowNumber
,       *
from    @t

... presumably for the same reason. However, this code does not give an error:

declare @t table (SortColumn int)
insert @t values (1), (2), (3)
declare @asc bit
set @asc = 0

select  row_number() over (order by
            case when @asc=1 then SortColumn end asc,
            case when @asc=0 then SortColumn end desc) RowNumber
,       *
from    @t

The only difference here from the first codeblock is that I have moved one of the case statements' conditional operands into a variable, @asc. This now works fine. Why, though? The case statements may still evaluate to NULL, which is a constant, so it shouldn't work... but it does. Is this consistent somehow, or is it special case behaviour put in by Microsoft?

All this behvaiour can be checked by playing around with this query.


Update: This restriction doesn't just apply to OVER clauses (though they do give a different error) - it applies to all ORDER BY clauses since SQL Server 2005. Here's a query that also shows the restriction with a regular SELECT's ORDER BY clause.

share|improve this question
    
Isn't 1=1 also a constant? It evaluates always to TRUE. –  Crack Aug 26 '11 at 13:08
    
@Crack Yes, but it's a constant within a case statement so I don't see why that makes a difference? That would seem to be saying, "If the statement definitely evaluates (or not) to NULL, it's not allowed. If it might evaluate to NULL, it's allowed." That doesn't make sense... why would the latter be allowed? How is it more valid a syntax? –  Jez Aug 26 '11 at 13:13
    
You can order by a constant. Use ORDER BY (SELECT NULL) or ORDER BY @@SPID –  Martin Smith Aug 26 '11 at 13:27
1  
Did you try to actually order by the expressions that cause errors with windowed functions? They produce errors in the proper ORDER BY too: 'A constant expression was encountered in the ORDER BY list, position n'. So this works and breaks consistently in ORDER BY, regardless of its being used in windowed functions. –  Andriy M Aug 26 '11 at 23:48
1  
@Andriy - This depends on compatibility mode. A very similar discussion is here dbaspot.com/sqlserver-programming/… –  Martin Smith Aug 26 '11 at 23:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Books online indicates that "A sort column can include an expression, but when the database is in SQL Server (90) compatibility mode, the expression cannot resolve to a constant." however it does not define "constant".

From thinking about it and some experimentation it seems clear that this means an expression for which a literal constant value can successfully be calculated at compile time.

/*Works - Constant at run time but SQL Server doesn't do variable sniffing*/
DECLARE @Foo int
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY @Foo) 
FROM master..spt_values 

/*Works - Constant folding not done for divide by zero*/
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY $/0) 
FROM master..spt_values 

/*Fails - Windowed functions do not support 
   constants as ORDER BY clause expressions.*/
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY $/1) 
FROM master..spt_values 
share|improve this answer
1  
This looks like an accurate description of the restriction. Why the restriction is in place is another matter, though... –  Jez Aug 27 '11 at 9:16

The evaluations in your first example will never change.

You are comparing a constant to a constant which will constantly result in a constant.

1=1 will always be TRUE.
1=0 will always be FALSE.

share|improve this answer
    
The same question applies here as the one I asked @Crack before; are you saying that the rule is, "If the statement definitely evaluates (or not) to NULL, it's not allowed. If it might evaluate to NULL, it's allowed." That doesn't make sense... why would the latter be allowed? How is it more valid a syntax? –  Jez Aug 26 '11 at 13:29
    
The rule is "if there is a constant evaluation it can't be in an OVER clause", I suspect. –  JNK Aug 26 '11 at 13:33
    
Seems like a weird rule to me. If SQL Server can deal with non-constant evaluations, shouldn't it be - if anything - easier to deal with constant ones? –  Jez Aug 26 '11 at 13:39
    
@Jez - not when the ORDER BY is essential to the window function working. If you could saw OVER(ORDER BY 'blah') then that would be pointless. SQL Server is very good about not letting you do things that will give unexpected results, unlike some other RDBMS –  JNK Aug 26 '11 at 13:48
    
@JNK - there are occasions when you just need a sequence and don't care about ordering and using a constant allows you to avoid an unnecessary sort. One example here –  Martin Smith Aug 26 '11 at 14:16

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