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I have files with the following format:

ATOM   8962  CA  VAL W   8       8.647  81.467  25.656  1.00115.78           C  
ATOM   8963  C   VAL W   8      10.053  80.963  25.506  1.00114.60           C  
ATOM   8964  O   VAL W   8      10.636  80.422  26.442  1.00114.53           O  
ATOM   8965  CB  VAL W   8       7.643  80.389  25.325  1.00115.67           C  
ATOM   8966  CG1 VAL W   8       6.476  80.508  26.249  1.00115.54           C  
ATOM   8967  CG2 VAL W   8       7.174  80.526  23.886  1.00115.26           C  
ATOM   4440  O   TYR S  89       4.530 166.005 -14.543  1.00 95.76           O  
ATOM   4441  CB  TYR S  89       2.847 168.812 -13.864  1.00 96.31           C  
ATOM   4442  CG  TYR S  89       3.887 169.413 -14.756  1.00 98.43           C  
ATOM   4443  CD1 TYR S  89       3.515 170.073 -15.932  1.00100.05           C  
ATOM   4444  CD2 TYR S  89       5.251 169.308 -14.451  1.00100.50           C  
ATOM   4445  CE1 TYR S  89       4.464 170.642 -16.779  1.00100.70           C  
ATOM   4446  CE2 TYR S  89       6.219 169.868 -15.298  1.00101.40           C  
ATOM   4447  CZ  TYR S  89       5.811 170.535 -16.464  1.00100.46           C  
ATOM   4448  OH  TYR S  89       6.736 171.094 -17.321  1.00100.20           O  
ATOM   4449  N   LEU S  90       3.944 166.393 -12.414  1.00 94.95           N  
ATOM   4450  CA  LEU S  90       5.079 165.622 -11.914  1.00 94.44           C  
ATOM   5151  N   LEU W   8     -66.068 209.785 -11.037  1.00117.44           N  
ATOM   5152  CA  LEU W   8     -64.800 210.035 -10.384  1.00116.52           C  
ATOM   5153  C   LEU W   8     -64.177 208.641 -10.198  1.00116.71           C  
ATOM   5154  O   LEU W   8     -64.513 207.944  -9.241  1.00116.99           O  
ATOM   5155  CB  LEU W   8     -65.086 210.682  -9.033  1.00115.76           C  
ATOM   5156  CG  LEU W   8     -64.274 211.829  -8.478  1.00113.89           C  
ATOM   5157  CD1 LEU W   8     -64.528 211.857  -7.006  1.00111.94           C  
ATOM   5158  CD2 LEU W   8     -62.828 211.612  -8.739  1.00112.96           C  

In principle, column 5 (W, in this case, which represents the chain ID) should be identical only in consecutive chunks. However, in files with too many chains, there are no enough letters of the alphabet to assign a single ID per chain and therefore duplicity may occur.

I would like to be able to check whether or not this is the case. In other words I would like to know if a given chain ID (A-Z, always in the 5th column) is present in non-consecutive chunks. I do not mind if it changes from W to S, I would like to know if there are two chunks sharing the same chain ID. In this case, if W or S reappear at some point. In fact, this is only a problem if they also share the first and the 6th columns, but I do not want to complicate things too much.

I do not want to print the lines, just to know the name of the file in which the issue occurs and the chain ID (in this case W), in order to solve the problem. In fact, I already know how to solve the problem, but I need to identify the problematic files to focus on those ones and not repairing already sane files.

SOLUTION (thanks to all for your help and namely to sehe):

for pdb in $(ls *.pdb) ; do
hit=$(awk -v pdb="$pdb" '{ if ( $1 == "ATOM" ) { print $0 } }' $pdb | cut -c22-23 | uniq | sort | uniq -dc)
[ "$hit" ] && echo $pdb = $hit
done
share|improve this question
    
In your example, "W" appears in the first line and last line. Are these two different atoms, thus "W" is okay, or is this an issue? How do I know if an atom is changed? Is it the fourth column "LEU" vs. "VAL" vs. "TYR". Or, does it have something to do with a sequence in the second column? The problem is that you have to keep track of letters used for each atom, but I'm not sure how to delineate atoms. –  David W. Aug 26 '11 at 13:58
    
Glad you finally got some easier to deal with data. BUT, if you can change the program that produces this output, (as you have indicated in previous questions and comments) why not just fix it to have a 2 or 3 char ATOM identifier, i.e. AA, .... ZZ? Would that be enough to eliminate the need to fix the data? Good luck. –  shellter Aug 26 '11 at 14:00
    
The problem is that there are different ATOMS that share the same chain ID and residue ID. This results from having more different chains than alphabet letters. it is a rare problem that occurs when they build large biological assemblies in which there are too many different chains (typically because the crystallographer assigned different chain IDs to residues containing heteroatoms, instead of considering them as "belonging to a chain). I have parsed 300 files and only found the problem in one. I could correct it by hand, but I would like to develop a general automatic method. –  mirix Aug 26 '11 at 14:08
    
Shellter, unlike in the other examples, this is an standard format which is produced and parsed by hundreds of programs. No, in this case you cannot change the format. The other problems you refer to are nearly solved. I just needed to split the problems in simple cases and do one thing at a time. Not very elegant, but it is almost done (I just need to solve a couple of very exceptional issues such like this one...). –  mirix Aug 26 '11 at 14:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For this particular sample:

cut -c22-23 t | uniq | sort | uniq -dc

Will output

2 W

(the 22nd column contains 2 runs of the letter 'W')

share|improve this answer
    
This works but I would like to restrict the counting to lines for which the first column is ATOM. I have done it by extracting them to a temporary file. More elegant solutions would be welcome. –  mirix Aug 26 '11 at 14:32
    
By the way, what does that "t" mean? I had to remove it. –  mirix Aug 26 '11 at 14:35
    
OK. This is it: awk '{ if ( $1 == "ATOM" ) { print $0 } }' 2Q7N_pisa.pdb | cut -c22-23 | uniq | sort | uniq -dc –  mirix Aug 26 '11 at 14:45
    
Is there a way to also output the filename? –  mirix Aug 26 '11 at 14:51
    
SOLUTION: for pdb in $(ls *.pdb) ; do hit=$(awk -v pdb="$pdb" '{ if ( $1 == "ATOM" ) { print $0 } }' $pdb | cut -c22-23 | uniq | sort | uniq -dc) [ "$hit" ] && echo $pdb = $hit done –  mirix Aug 26 '11 at 15:06

So if the fifth column contains a value we have already seen, and we did not see it in the previous line, print it?

awk '{ if (s[$5] && $5 != prev) print;
    s[$5] = prev = $5 }' file

Printing the line number etc is left as an exercise.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I think I did not explain the problem well. I have a chunk of consecutive lines in which the fifth column is A, then a chunk in which is B, etc. (not necessarily in alphabetic order). I am interested if finding non-consecutive chunks (chains). This means, that I can have say a hundred lines in which is A and then 50 lines in which is B. I am not interested on that, I want to know if A or B will reappear in other chains. –  mirix Aug 26 '11 at 13:34
    
I still understand that to mean, if you ever see A again after you got out of the first block of consecutive A lines, that's something you want to find. –  tripleee Aug 26 '11 at 14:22

untested

awk '
    seen[$5] && $5 != current {
        print "found non-consecutive chain on line " NR
        exit
    }
    { current = $5; seen[$5] = 1 }
' filename
share|improve this answer

Here you go, this awk script is tested and takes into account not just 'W':

{
    if (ln[$5] && ln[$5] + 1 != NR) {
        print "dup " $5 " at line " NR;
    }
    ln[$5] = NR;
}
share|improve this answer

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