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I just write one producer-consumer demo in scala and java. The demo shows that the performance of Scala is so poor. Is my code wrong?

Java AVG:1933534.1171935236
Scala AVG:103943.7312328648

The Scala code:

import scala.actors.Actor.actor
import scala.actors.Actor.loop
import scala.actors.Actor.react
import scala.concurrent.ops.spawn
object EventScala {

case class Event(index: Int)

def test() {
    val consumer = actor {
        var count = 0l
        val start = System.currentTimeMillis()
        loop {
            react {
                case Event(c) => count += 1
                case "End" =>
                    val end = System.currentTimeMillis()
                    println("Scala AVG:" + count * 1000.0 / (end - start))
                    exit()
            }
        }
    }
    var running = true;
    for (i <- 0 to 1) {
        {
            spawn {
                while (running) {
                    consumer ! Event(0)
                }
                consumer!"End"
            }
        }
    }
    Thread.sleep(5000)
    running = false
}

def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
    test
}

}

The Java code:

import java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;
import java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue;

public class EventJava {
static BlockingQueue<Event> queue = new LinkedBlockingQueue<EventJava.Event>();
static volatile boolean running = true;
static volatile Event sentinel = new Event(0);

static class Event {
    final int index;

    public Event(int index) {
        this.index = index;
    }
}

static class Consumer implements Runnable {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        long count = 0;
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        while (true) {
            try {
                Event event = queue.take();
                if (event == sentinel) {
                    long end = System.currentTimeMillis();
                    System.out.println("Java AVG:" + count * 1000.0
                            / (end - start));
                    break;
                }
                count++;
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            }
        }
    }
}

static class Producer implements Runnable {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        while (running) {
            queue.add(new Event(1));
        }
        queue.add(sentinel);
    }
}

static void test() throws InterruptedException {
    ExecutorService pool = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
    pool.submit(new Consumer());
    pool.execute(new Producer());
    pool.execute(new Producer());
    Thread.sleep(5000);
    running = false;
    pool.shutdown();
}

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
    test();
}

}
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4  
Scalas number is smaller isn't that better? –  Woot4Moo Aug 26 '11 at 13:11
1  
@home look at the code (case "End" in scala code) –  om-nom-nom Aug 26 '11 at 13:21
    
I don't know if you ran your numbers with this mistake, but you start 2 producers in the Java code. But if you fix it, Java will look even better than Scala. –  toto2 Aug 26 '11 at 14:26
    
I tried it on Windows XP 32-bits, Java 7 vs Scala 2.10: Java (with one producer) = 2,000,000 vs Scala = 42,000. Ouch! I also checked the number of messages sent by both during the 5 seconds: 11,000,000 for Java and 5,500,000 for Scala. (Scala would have looked bad in your benchmark if it was more efficient at producing messages.) –  toto2 Aug 26 '11 at 14:38
    
You are missing "@volatile var running" in your Sacla code. Not that it makes much difference for the test results. –  Lex Aug 26 '11 at 17:40

5 Answers 5

Overall, this is a very un-scientific test. No warmup. Low number of iterations. Very very un-sciency. Look at google caliper or such for ideas on making better micro-benchmarks.

Once your numbers are clear: compile it into scala, and then decompile it into java. The answer may jump out.

I think in your case it may be the configuration of the actors. Try akka also.

share|improve this answer
    
Compilation + decompilation is a great suggestion. –  Chris Dennett Aug 26 '11 at 14:35
3  
10,000,000 is not a low number of iterations. You don't have to design sciency benchmarks to know something is very wrong when you are slower by 2 orders of magnitude. –  toto2 Aug 26 '11 at 14:47
3  
Actually, it is a low number of iterations. On my box, the java version runs in about 5-6 seconds. This means that if something happens on the machine (another process) which slows it down by a second, then you've lost 20% of your performance. Which is why performance measurement is so hard. –  Matthew Farwell Aug 26 '11 at 15:14
2  
@MatthieuF Yes, but we are talking of a factor 100 here, that's 10000% difference, not 20%. –  toto2 Aug 26 '11 at 16:00
    
A 6 second test has no meaning when comparing speeds. –  bwawok Aug 26 '11 at 18:26

You are testing two very different codes. Let's consider Java, for instance:

    while (true) {

Where's the opportunity for the other "actors" to take over the thread and do some processing of their own? This "actor" is pretty much hogging the thread. If you create 100000 of them, you'll see JVM get crushed under the weight of the competing "actors", or see some get all processing time while others languish.

            Event event = queue.take();
            if (event == sentinel) {

Why are you taking the event out of the queue without checking if it can be processed or not? If it couldn't be processed, you'll loose the event. If you added it back to the queue, it will end up after other events sent by the same source.

These are just two things that the Scala code does and the Java one doesn't.

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It looks like you know what you are talking about. Could you clarify about actors: you seem to imply that more than one consumer actor is created automatically by Scala? And is checking-if-ready-for-processing relevant for this example? –  toto2 Aug 26 '11 at 15:47
2  
@toto2 No, only actors you create are created. However, it is expected that many actors will be created, which is what things like loop and react are optimized for. My point is that Scala actors are prepared for much more, not that the example takes advantage of them. But irrespective of whether the example is taking advantage of them, all the infrastructure is there. Naturally, if you compare it to something without all that infrastructure, it will be slower. –  Daniel C. Sobral Aug 26 '11 at 17:59

I have a machine with 4 processors. If I run your java code, I get full processor usage on a single processor (25%). That is, you're using a single thread.

If I run your scala code I get full usage of all processors, I'm getting four threads.

So I suspect that two things are happening: you're getting contention updating count, and/or count isn't being incremented correctly.

Also, the test that you're doing in the loop is a pattern match in Scala, but is a simple equality in Java, but I suspect this is a minor part.

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loop and react both throw exceptions for the purpose of flow control. This means that there are two tasks given to the thread pool, only one of which does actual work. Exceptions are also much more expensive than regular returns, even when the JVM successfully optimizes them down to longjmps.

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Actors are meant for small messages that result in meaningful computations, not for element-by-element data processing as above.

Your Actor code is really more comparable to an ExecutorService with multiple threads, where each message represents a new Runnable/Callable being submitted, rather than what you have in your Java code.

Your benchmark is really comparing "how fast a worker thread can consume an item from a queue" vs. "how fast can scala send a message to a mailbox, notify and schedule the actor, and handle the message". It's just not the same thing, and it's not fit for the same purpose.

Regardless, Scala can use Java threads too. Scala just gives you an additional (safer, simpler, and communications-based) concurrency mechanism.

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