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Assuming you were going to write a function / method to find a prime number, what would be the most efficient way to do this? I'm thinking that it would be a test that is something like this:

Code Below in semi-c++

bool primeTest (int x) { //X is the number we're testing
    int testUpTo = (int)((sqrt(x))+1);
    for (int i=3; i<testUpTo; i+=2){
        if ((x%i)==0) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Does someone have a better way to go about solving this that will take less computations?

edit: Changed code slightly, twice. I didn't write this with any specific language in mind, although I suppose it's C++ over java due to the word bool.

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See sieve of Eratosthenes. May be more useful if you need to repeat the operation. –  Ed Heal Aug 26 '11 at 13:35
    
Are we talking runtime computation or compile time computation? –  Flexo Aug 26 '11 at 13:36
    
Reject even numbers from start. Only do the modulo test against odd numbers. Halved your computations, yay! –  Nicolas Repiquet Aug 26 '11 at 13:38
    
See: stackoverflow.com/questions/2385909/… –  Bart Kiers Aug 26 '11 at 13:39
1  
Do you really want the fastest (of course I assume you mean runtime complexity with that), or just a fast one without any complex math? For the fastest, you could use some of the AKS class of the prime number tests. –  PlasmaHH Aug 26 '11 at 13:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I would use the Miller Rabin test, which can easily be made deterministic for numbers smaller than 341,550,071,728,321 (and 2^31 is much smaller than that).

Pseudocode: there are a number of different cases.

  1. x smaller than 9: Return (x & 1) != 0 || x == 2
  2. x smaller than about 200 (tweakable): use trial division (what you used)
  3. x smaller than 1373653: use Miller Rabin with bases 2 and 3.
  4. x smaller than 4759123141 (that is everything else): use Miller Rabin with bases 2, 7 and 61.
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Apart from 2 and 3, all prime numbers are one more or one less than a multiple of six. Using that fact would improve your code. Something like this (untested)

bool primeTest (int x){//X is the number we're testing
    if (x == 1) return false;
    if (x == 2 || x == 3) return true;
    if(x%2 == 0 || x%3 == 0)
         return false;

    int testUpTo = (int)((sqrt(x))+1);
    for(int i=6; i<testUpTo; i+=6){
        if ((x%(i-1))==0 || x%(i+1)==0){
            return false;
         }
     }
     return true;
}

Of course there has been centuries of advanced mathematics to try and find more efficient primality tests.

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This function gives the wrong result for the numbers 1, 2, and 3. –  Blastfurnace Aug 26 '11 at 16:47
    
@Blastfurnace: Fixed –  john Aug 26 '11 at 17:13

Wikipedia has a pretty good article on that:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primality_test

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You can have a look at this paper who test the performance of different primality tests :

PRIMALITY TESTING by Richard P. Brent: http://cs.anu.edu.au/student/comp4600/lectures/comp4600_primality.pdf

(see this other post : What is the fastest deterministic primality test for numbers in the range 2^1024 to 2^4096?)

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You can improve your code testing only odd values.

bool primeTest (int x){//X is the number we're testing
    if(x == 2)
         return true;

    int testUpTo = (int)((sqrt(x))+1);
    for(int i=3; i<testUpTo; i+=2){
        if ((x%i)==0){
            return false;
         }
     }
     return true;
}
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1  
more than that you can just test for prime values :D –  Ricky Bobby Aug 26 '11 at 13:38
    
Except that it wouldn't work for x == 2, this is still extremely inefficient. –  jarnbjo Aug 26 '11 at 13:38
    
@jambjo first line : if(x % 2 == 0) return false; –  Ricky Bobby Aug 26 '11 at 13:41
    
It's a mistake. 2 is prime so it should return true. I have edited my code. –  Ackar Aug 26 '11 at 13:42
    
@ricky: Ackar exactly. The original test claimed that 2 is not prime. Ackar just edited his response, but the code is still incorrect. Now it claims all even numbers to be prime. –  jarnbjo Aug 26 '11 at 13:44

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