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polymorphic resolution of generic parameters in Unity registerType

This is probably obvious. But can someone tell me why this is not valid code? The compiler says it can't convert Class1<string> to Class1<object>. Is upcasting this way not allowed with generics? If so, why not?

namespace Test
{
    public class Tests
    {
        public void Test()
        {            
            Class1<object> objectClass1 = new Class1<string>();
        }
    }
    class Class1<T>
    {
    }
}
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marked as duplicate by cdhowie, Grant Thomas, Craig Stuntz, Matthew Abbott, Gabe Aug 26 '11 at 13:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6  
This is a common question, search for covariance. Here is one thread on the topic: stackoverflow.com/questions/2662369/… –  JohnD Aug 26 '11 at 13:32
1  
Also see my answer to a similar question for an explanation of why this is not allowed. –  cdhowie Aug 26 '11 at 13:35

2 Answers 2

Have a look at

Covariance and Contravariance in Generics.

Eric Lippert has a series of blog posts on this subject.

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Not sure why this was voted down it addresses the question asked corectly. –  Ben Robinson Aug 26 '11 at 13:45
    
@Ben: This may address the question, but it does not answer it. It's like asking your professor a question and them telling you that the answer is in the textbook. –  Gabe Aug 27 '11 at 5:56

String, Int32, and so on are Struct types, while object, Person and so on are class objects for C#. For this reason, when you create generics, you have to specify a constraint if you plan to use casting features. So, you can use

public void Method<T>() where T : class
or
public void Method<T>() where T : struct
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This is completely unrelated to the question. –  Gabe Aug 26 '11 at 13:40

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