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In order to use static data members in C++, I have currently something like that :

// HEADER FILE .h
class MyClass {
private :
    static double myvariable;
};

// CPP FILE .cpp
double MyClass::myvariable = 0;

But if now I have :

// HEADER FILE .h
class MyClass {
private :
    static double myarray[1000];
};

How can I initialize it ?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
First thing first. Arrays are evil. :) You should try to use vector. No really. And secondly, your static array is guaranteed to be initialized to zero. Dont worry. – Ajeet Aug 26 '11 at 15:01
up vote 13 down vote accepted

The same as you initialize ordinary arrays:

double MyClass::myarray[1000] = { 1.1, 2.2, 3.3 };

Missing elements will be set to zero.

share|improve this answer
    
Downvoter, care to explain your objection? – Kerrek SB Aug 26 '11 at 14:26
2  
:/ Seems like the most appropriate way to do it. It's a large array, an initialization list will be tedious, but it's the most straight forward way to guarantee it's initialized appropriately. Also, other answers that reference the constructor are problematic because they require an instance of the object to be created before the static data members are in a known state. – Chad Aug 26 '11 at 14:35
    
Perhaps a complex number of values is required that may be necessary to be computed. – Ed Heal Aug 26 '11 at 14:36
2  
I'm still struggling to understand why this has been downvoted -- twice now. Given the OP question of a large c-style array, what is a better way to initialize this properly as a static class variable. I posit that doing so in the constructor is not appropriate (reasons given above). – Chad Aug 26 '11 at 15:08
1  
@Ed: If you were to use C++, you'd use std::array or std::vector -- there's no limit to how much one can fix someone's ideas, but to answer a question one has to stay in scope some times. C++11 adds initializer lists that let you initialize member arrays in a constructor, but as far as this static array is concerned, there's really not much else you can say. Do take it up with the OP if you think his design is wrong, but what has this to do with this answer? – Kerrek SB Aug 26 '11 at 15:16

Try this,

class MyClass {
private :
    static double myarray[1000];
};

double MyClass::myarray[]={11,22};
share|improve this answer

You could add a non-pod static member that would initialize myvariable from it's constructor

This is a little like 'RIAA-by-proxy' if you will.

Beware of the Static Initialization Fiasco

share|improve this answer

Why not do this - change the array to a vector. Use another class that is a superclass of vector and do the initialisation of the array (vector) in its constructor. You are then able to make it as complex as you require and also just treat it as an array>

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