Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a Rails 3.1 app, how can I safely embed some JSON data into an HTML document?

Suppose I have this in a controller action:

@tags = [
    {name:"tag1", color:"green"}, 
    {name:"</script><b>I can do something bad here</b>", color:"red"}
]

And this in a corresponding view:

<script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">
    //<![CDATA[
    var tags_list = <%= @tags.to_json %>;
    // ]]>
</script>

Then I get this in resulting HTML:

var tags_list = [
    {&quot;name&quot;:&quot;tag1&quot;,&quot;color&quot;:&quot;green&quot;},
    {&quot;name&quot;:&quot;&lt;/script&gt;&lt;b&gt;I can do something bad here&lt;/b&gt;&quot;,&quot;color&quot;:&quot;red&quot;}
];

which triggers a SyntaxError: Unexpected token & in Chrome

If I remove the Rails' default HTML escaping with <%=raw tags.to_json %>, then it returns this:

var tags_list = [
    {"name":"tag1","color":"green"},
    {"name":"</script><b>I can do something bad here</b>","color":"red"}
];

which, of course, breaks the HTML document with </script>.

Can I somehow tell to_json() method to return something more like this:

var tags_list = [
    {"name":"tag1","color":"green"},
    {"name":"&lt;/script&gt;&lt;b&gt;I can do something bad here&lt;/b&gt;","color":"red"}
];

I asked this question on rubyonrails-talk mailing list, and I understand now that some people think that's a very bad idea to begin with, but in my case it works very nicely, as long as there are no HTML special chars in the data. So I just want to make the string returned by to_json HTML safe and still have JavaScript parse it properly.

UPDATE: Based on @coreyward comment, I did make it a JS string literal, and that seems to be working great now. Its not quite as elegant of a solution as I was hoping for, but its not too bad either. Here is the code that is working for me:

<% tags = [{name:"tag1", color:"green"}, {name:"</script><b>I can \n\ndo something bad here</b>", color:"red"}] %>

<script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">
    //<![CDATA[
    var tags_list = $.parseJSON('<%=j tags.to_json.html_safe %>');
    // ]]>
</script>

which results in:

<script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">
    //<![CDATA[
    var tags_list = $.parseJSON('[{\"name\":\"tag1\",\"color\":\"green\"},{\"name\":\"<\/script><b>I can \\n\\ndo something bad here<\/b>\",\"color\":\"red\"}]');
    // ]]>
</script>
share|improve this question
    
HTML enclosed in a JS string literal shouldn't affect the rendering of the page. It should be treated like any other character in a string. You might want to investigate what is really happening when you use raw tags.to_json. –  coreyward Aug 26 '11 at 14:12
    
or tags.to_json.html_safe –  rubish Aug 26 '11 at 14:15
    
You are wrapping the JSON in <script> tags right? As long as it's within a script, the HTML will be ignored... trust me you can have a JS string inside a script that has an entire page (<html><head>.. etc) of valid tags and it won't mess with rendering. –  Rudu Aug 26 '11 at 14:19
    
Second code snippet in my question is how I'm embedding it in HTML page. So it is inside <script> tags, and is not inside string literals, but rather like raw JS object. This is working great as long as there are no HTML special chars in the @tags variable. –  nnc Aug 26 '11 at 14:52
3  
Bounty message below should've been: Is there really no standard way of escaping "</script>" strings inside JSON that's embedded directly into Rails views? –  Jordan Brough Sep 30 '11 at 20:31

3 Answers 3

Your code using just @tags.to_json works in rails3, if you enable it with:

   ActiveSupport.escape_html_entities_in_json = true

Otherwise, your other option is this:

   var tags_list = <%= raw @tags.to_json.gsub("</", "<\\/") %>;

This saves the client having to parse the whole thing through $

share|improve this answer
    
actually activesupport escapes <, > and &. I think it would be best to do so yourselve as well if you want to be on the safe side. –  markijbema Mar 14 '12 at 13:09
    
Google gson (their java json encoder) makes a good case to replace the following characters with their unicode counterpart. < \u003c, > \u003e, & \u0026, = \u003d, ' \u0027 The reason for this is we as developers tend to stick json in a bunch of crazy places (eg attributes). –  reconbot Apr 12 '13 at 19:42

I think that if you try this it will work:

var tags_list = "<%== @tags.to_json.gsub('/', '\/') %>";

(Notice the double == and the " ")

share|improve this answer

btw, this works but is not a good solution in my opinion:

<script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">
  //<![CDATA[
  var tags_list = <%=raw @tags.to_json.gsub('/', '\/') %>;
  // ]]>
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
note: another relevant stack overflow discussion -- stackoverflow.com/questions/1580647/… –  Jordan Brough Sep 30 '11 at 20:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.