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Looked through the questions with similar titles and nothing was close enough to get this query working. I know this is probably something fairly simple though.

The actual query is this:

select entries.id, entry_id, user_id, person_id, campaign_id, mood_id, entries.created, deleted_date, entries.modified, entry_type, walking_hash 

 from entries, users 

where users.id = entries.user_id and users.is_deleted = 0 and entries.is_deleted = 0 

and entries.entry_type in ('xyz', 'abc', 'def', 'lmno')

To get the count I tried this:

select count(entries.id, entry_id, user_id, person_id, campaign_id, mood_id, entries.created, deleted_date, entries.modified, entry_type, walking_hash) 

from entries, users 

where users.id = entries.user_id and users.is_deleted = 0 and entries.is_deleted = 0 and entries.entry_type in ('xyz', 'abc', 'def', 'lmno')

but that throws a non-descript error and doesn't run.

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1  
if you just want a count and don't need to data from the query try running it with count(*) – Nalum Aug 26 '11 at 14:40
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should use simple

Select count(entries.id)  ....
share|improve this answer
    
What's the difference between doing select count(1) as suggested in the first answer, vs. doing select count(entries.id) as you suggest? It seems to me like both would give you the same count so I'm curious to know why this is better? – mountaingirl Aug 26 '11 at 14:49
    
@velvetpuzzle Count(1) = Count(), if your column can have null value you will get total count, but count(entries.id)=count() - number of null value – Andrej Ludinovskov Aug 26 '11 at 14:55
    
And if you do select count(*)? I've run it all 3 ways and get the same result byt the first column is never null because its the primary key and not allowed to be null. – mountaingirl Aug 26 '11 at 15:00
    
@velvetpuzzle Yeap :) – Andrej Ludinovskov Aug 26 '11 at 15:03

What exactly do you want to count? just the number of rows? use COUNT(*). use COUNT(column) to count all non-NULL values in this column.

The query will then only return a single row, the count.

select count(*) as count
from entries, users 
where users.id = entries.user_id and users.is_deleted = 0 and entries.is_deleted = 0 
and entries.entry_type in ('xyz', 'abc', 'def', 'lmno')
share|improve this answer
    
In this code: for($i = 0; $i < $total_entries_count; $i = $i + $chunk_size) the var $total_entries_count is being set to the result of the count query I'm trying to fix. Inside that is a foreach loop handling each row (using objects actually) so it's important that the count query match the actual # of results. So yes, I am counting rows returned by the first query. – mountaingirl Aug 26 '11 at 14:53
    
@velvetpuzzle: so simply use COUNT(*). you could however also use mysqli_num_rows($result); instead of using a separate count query – knittl Aug 26 '11 at 14:55
    
I think that saves me having an extra function in my class with the separate count query. Thank you for mentioning that. – mountaingirl Aug 26 '11 at 15:02
    
Actually it doesn't; good trick for more procedural code. For OOP stuff you have to solve it another way. I ended up sticking with 2 separate functions to keep code more readable. – mountaingirl Aug 26 '11 at 16:59
select count(1) 

from entries, users 

where users.id = entries.user_id and users.is_deleted = 0 and entries.is_deleted = 0 and entries.entry_type in ('xyz', 'abc', 'def', 'lmno')
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