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I'm having a bito f a problem with EF and transaction processing.

I'm trying to do this:

using(TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
{
  using(MyEntities model = new MyEntities())
  {
    MyT thing = new MyT{ Value1 = "bla", Value2 = "bla2", Value3 = "foo" };
    model.MyT.AddObject(thing);
    model.SaveChanges();

    thing.Value4 = Service.Call("bar");

    // this call causes an exception in MSDTC
    model.SaveChanges();

    scope.Complete();
  }
}

The reason i do this is because I want to do an insert in to the db so MyT has a unique id that i passto the service when i make the call i then get back a unique ref and status from the service depicting what happened during the call which i then need to append to the record.

My understanding is that during a single transaction you can only update a record once / make an insert call but you can't do both as this creates a problem for some reason ... i used to have an MSDN article that explained some logical reason why this couldn't be done (likely lock related).

So my problem is how to get round this but ensure that in event of any failure in any of these calls i can still rollback.

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what is your question? how is the code you posted working? it looks ok to me. –  Davide Piras Aug 26 '11 at 15:11
    
What's the exception? –  JNappi Aug 26 '11 at 15:12
    
The exception is a com+ exception that simply reads "exception occured in a com+ object" that's it ... nothing in the event logs either which doesn't help. –  Wardy Aug 26 '11 at 16:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try creating the transactionscope with transaction options. In the transaction options specify ReadUncommitted.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.transactions.isolationlevel.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms149853.aspx

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This wasn't exactly spot on but through further digging I found the problem was that the code in question could not be included in a transaction due to the scope of the calls in question. Simply put, i'm using m own transactional mechanism. –  Wardy Aug 30 '11 at 7:50

When you make several connections to the db inside the transaction scope, the transaction will be promoted from local transaction to distributed transaction, unless you explicitily use the same connection to the db.

When the transaction is promoted it needs the MSDTC service to manage the transaction, so if this service is not available it will throw an exception.

Something like this:

using(TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
{
  using(MyEntities model = new MyEntities())
  {
    model.Connection.Open();
    MyT thing = new MyT{ Value1 = "bla", Value2 = "bla2", Value3 = "foo" };
    model.MyT.AddObject(thing);
    model.SaveChanges();

    thing.Value4 = Service.Call("bar");

    // this call shouldn't cause anymore an exception in MSDTC
    model.SaveChanges();

    scope.Complete();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The service is running but that then causes further complications because it decides it's going to give a com+ exception with literally nothing of value in any logs or given bac in the exception. –  Wardy Aug 26 '11 at 16:01
1  
It is more efficient to avoid using MSDTC when you can, try explicitily setting the connection to avoid it. –  TrymBeast Aug 26 '11 at 16:03
    
Another variation on MSDTC promotion is opening and closing a connection multiple times within a transaction (although I thought this had been fixed in newer versions of the framework). Try re-using the open connection and only closing it at the end of the transaction. –  Tim Lloyd Aug 26 '11 at 16:11
    
save changes automatically makes an internal open call on a connection ... i gather it will also close the connection too after each savechanges call ... meaning that all you did was wrap the existing code in a try catch (something i'm already doing but omitted for simplicity) –  Wardy Aug 26 '11 at 16:11
    
But you forgot one thing, I open the connection, and because of the connection pool, when the save changes opens it, it is already opened, and so when it closes it, it doesn't really closes it, just decreases the opened counter, and only closes it when that counter reaches zero. That way all of the code is executing in the same connection avoiding MSDTC to come and reclaim the transaction. –  TrymBeast Aug 26 '11 at 16:13

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