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I found some rather strange code:

class Base {
public:
    virtual bool IsDerived() const { return false; }
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
    bool IsDerived() const { return true; }
};

Derived* CastToDerived( Base* base )
{
    // private and protected inheritance from Derived is prohibited
    Derived* derived = dynamic_cast<Derived*>(base);
    if( derived == 0 ) {
       assert( !base->IsDerived() );
    }
    return derived;
}

I don't get the passage about private and protected inheritance.

Suppose, I inherit from Derived with protected modifier:

class FurtherDerived : protected Derived {
};

What happens? How will that assert get triggered?

share|improve this question
    
Please explain " I inherit from Derived with protected modifier" You are saying derive a new derived class from 'derived' class or protected inheritance of 'base' class ? –  Ajeet Aug 26 '11 at 16:06
    
Where did you find this code? It doesn't make any sense. If Derived is not publicly inheriting from Base the only thing that can be passed to CastToDerived() is a Base pointer, because there wouldn't be any way to convert a Derived pointer to a Base pointer. So the assertion can never be triggered. –  Praetorian Aug 26 '11 at 16:26
    
@Praetorian there are ways to get Base pointer from Derived even when Base is a private ancestor. For example, by adding Base* Derived::getBase() { return this; } –  hamstergene Aug 26 '11 at 16:30
    
@Eugene Homyakov Ok, good example, I wasn't think of having an explicit conversion function. –  Praetorian Aug 26 '11 at 16:31

4 Answers 4

If you have a Protected or Private Inheritance, You cannot do:

Base *ptr = new Derived();

neither can you do,

Derived *ptr1 = new Derived();
Base *ptr = ptr1;

This is because, Base is an inaccessible base of Derived

Since you cannot have a Base class pointer pointing to Derived class object, that check looks redundant.


EDIT:
Even if you cannot directly assign an Derived class object to an Base class pointer, It can happen so in some other ways like: If a function of Derived class returns a Base class pointer.

In short, A Base class pointer may point to a Derived class object even if derivation is protected or private.

Given the above,

As per C++ standard:
5.2.7.8:

The run-time check logically executes as follows:
— If, in the most derived object pointed (referred) to by v, v points (refers) to a public base class sub- object of a T object, and if only one object of type T is derived from the sub-object pointed (referred) to by v, the result is a pointer (an lvalue referring) to that T object.
Otherwise, if v points (refers) to a public base class sub-object of the most derived object, and the type of the most derived object has a base class, of type T, that is unambiguous and public, the result is a pointer (an lvalue referring) to the T sub-object of the most derived object.
— Otherwise, the run-time check fails.

Note that the standard specifically imposes the requirement of the derivation to be, Public.
Thus dynamic_cast will detect the treat the cast as an improper cast if derivation is protected or private and return a NULL(since you are using a pointer) and the assert will be called.

So Yes, the code is very much valid. And it indeed does what the comment says


This sample, demonstrates that it works as per the comments:

#include<iostream>
class Base 
{
    public:
        virtual bool IsDerived() const { return false; }
};

class Derived : protected Base 
{
    public:
        bool IsDerived() const { return true; }
        Base* getBase() { return this; }
};

Derived* CastToDerived( Base* base )
{
     // private and protected inheritance from Derived is prohibited
     Derived* derived = dynamic_cast<Derived*>(base);
     if( derived == 0 ) 
     {
         std::cout<< "!base->IsDerived()";
     }
     return derived;
}


int main()
{
    Derived *ptr3 = new Derived();
    Base *ptr = ptr3->getBase();
    Derived *ptr2 = CastToDerived(ptr);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You misread the question. Derived has public inheritance from Base . It is a given. The question is with regard to some class NonPublicDerived that has private or protected inheritance from class Derived. –  David Hammen Aug 26 '11 at 17:17
    
@David Hammen: I don't understand which NonPublicDerived class you are referring to here. –  Alok Save Aug 26 '11 at 21:04
    
The class to which I am referring is some unspecified class that derives from class Derived. Here is the question the OP asked us to answer: "Suppose, I inherit from Derived with protected modifier. What happens?". Nothing there about how class Derived is formed. How class Derived is formed is a given: public inheritance from class Base. The question is about some unspecified class that inherits from Derived, but does so with either protected or private inheritance. –  David Hammen Aug 26 '11 at 21:09
    
@David Hammen: I am not sure I understand what you want to say, As i read the Q the OP clearly asks here, whether that dynamic_cast can do what the comment says it does i.e. assert if the derivation was private or protected. And the answer is Yes it does. And the reason is the standard specifically uses the word public while defining the dynamic_cast as the answer points out. –  Alok Save Aug 26 '11 at 21:13
    
Did you try it as the OP asked? I did. See my answer. You are answering a question that the OP didn't ask. The OP never asked about class Derived : protected Base. –  David Hammen Aug 26 '11 at 21:28

IsDerived is a virtual function defined in the base class, and the functions are resolved based on the static type of the object using which you invoke the function. That means, that's not a problem. It will work. (Or maybe, I missed something in your question).

share|improve this answer
    
-1: Invoking a member function that is declared virtual in some base class with a base class pointer will result in a call to the most derived implementation of that method. If C++ worked the way you claim it does a huge mountain of C++ programs that depend on C++ doing virtual dispatch would never work. –  David Hammen Aug 26 '11 at 17:31
    
@David: You either misunderstood my post Or don't know how virtual dispatch happens. All I'm saying is this : ideone.com/HsTrg . Explain its output to me! –  Nawaz Aug 26 '11 at 17:38

dynamic_cast performs run-time check (5.2.7/8).

The runtime check will fail, if Base is inherited as protected or private by Derived.

The value of failed run-time check when casting to a pointer is a NULL pointer (5.2.7/9).

So, the code is a workaround for private and protected descendants: if you inherit Derived with protected or private, dynamic_cast will return NULL and the custom check will be performed.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but how can the caller of CastToDerived convert a Derived pointer to a Base pointer if inheritance is not public? –  Praetorian Aug 26 '11 at 16:29
    
See my another comment in the original post :) –  hamstergene Aug 26 '11 at 16:31
    
This question is not how Derived inherits from Base. That is a given. The question is "Suppose, I inherit from Derived with protected modifier. What happens?" –  David Hammen Aug 26 '11 at 21:06
    
@David I've supposed it makes more sense that the comment doesn't mean what it says, than that one day dynamic_cast magically returned 0 when it shouldn't. –  hamstergene Aug 27 '11 at 3:54
    
@Eugene: Exactly. My guess is that the author of this code was trying to solve a problem, guessed the wrong cause, and wrote a non-working solution to this wrong guess. He later solved the real problem but never deleted his mostly harmless junk. Typical cargo cult debugging stuff. I said "mostly harmless" because this is a bomb just waiting to go off. Someday someone will write some class Foo : public Base that also overrides IsDerived(). Applying CastToDerived on a Foo pointer will drop core. –  David Hammen Aug 27 '11 at 4:12

I don't get the passage about private and protected inheritance.

The answer is simple. This comment like many, many other comments, is a comment that does not describe the code in any way, shape, or form.

Example:

class PrivateDerived : private Derived {
public:
   Base* cast_to_base () {
      return dynamic_cast<Base*>(this);
   }   
};  

void check_base (const char * id, Base* pbase) {
   if (pbase == 0) {
      std::cout << id << " conversion yields a null pointer.\n";
   }
   else {
      std::cout << id << "->IsDerived() = "
                << pbase->IsDerived() << "\n";
      Derived* pderived = CastToDerived (pbase);
      std::cout << "CastToDerived yields "
                << (pderived ? "non-null" : "null") << " pointer.\n";
      std::cout << "pderived->IsDerived() = "
                << pderived->IsDerived() << "\n\n";
   }
}

int main () {
   PrivateDerived private_derived;

   // Good old c-style cast can convert anything to anything.
   // Maybe a bit disfunctional, but it works in this case.
   check_base ("c_style_cast", (Base*)&private_derived);

   // The cast_to_base method can see the private inheritance,
   // and does so without invoking undefined behavior.
   check_base ("cast_method", private_derived.cast_to_base());

   return 0;
}

Tested with multiple versions of gcc and clang; none of them raised that assert statement.

Addendum
I suspect that what happened was that on some particular machine with some particular compiler, the code in question did somehow manage to do what the author thought it should do. I suspect that the author never tested this supposed check to see if it actually worked as advertised.

share|improve this answer
    
assertion fails if Derived has protected or private inheritance from Base. as in the question: "Suppose, I inherit from Derived with protected modifier." –  mkb Aug 26 '11 at 19:29
    
@mkb: I tested the above code with multiple compilers. The assertion did not fail with any one of them. That said, I obviously do not have access to every C++ compilers out there. It may well fail with some. If the above does fail with one, I would be curious. –  David Hammen Aug 26 '11 at 19:36
    
I said if Derived has protected or private inheritance, not PrivateDerived. –  mkb Aug 26 '11 at 19:39
    
What is it with this question that so many of the answers are completely orthogonal to the question at hand? Here is what the OP asked: Suppose, I inherit from Derived with protected modifier. What happens? How will that assert get triggered? Not a word in that question regarding what happens if class Derived has non-public inheritance from Base. –  David Hammen Aug 26 '11 at 19:54

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