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Reference - What does this symbol mean in PHP?

I've seen in PHP some variables that are set like this:

$var = @$something;

Or functions set like this:

$var = &my_function();

What effect do the @ and the & have?

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marked as duplicate by Gordon, Johan, Marc B, Jeremy W. Sherman, sblom Aug 26 '11 at 16:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Thanks for the links. Didn't know where to look (other than the operators page) –  Calvin Froedge Aug 26 '11 at 16:25
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4 Answers

You have them backwards. &$variable means "a reference to this variable." @my_function() means "call this function and suppress any errors or warnings that it produces."

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can we please not answer this because its a duplicate of duplicates –  Gordon Aug 26 '11 at 16:21
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@ means "don't report errors"

& means "take a reference to the following variable instead of copying its value"

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closevote. you haz the reputation for it. use it –  Gordon Aug 26 '11 at 16:23
    
Can you explain the difference between the two (take a reference, copy)? –  Calvin Froedge Aug 26 '11 at 16:24
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@ operator in php is used to ignore errors in that statement. Manual: http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.operators.errorcontrol.php

& is reference operator. Manual: http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.references.whatdo.php

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Thanks for the links –  Calvin Froedge Aug 26 '11 at 16:25
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@ causes to hide all errors. In case of variables, it might be E_NOTICE informing about variable not existing.

The &my_function(); is invalid - & is normally used for references, it doesn't nothing in this case.

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