Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Some of the checkboxes on my form should not be able to be checked/unchecked by users. Is there a way for me to cancel the event before the checbox's Check event is triggered?

in winForms it was easy, just

public void cb_BeforeChecked(object sender, EventArgs e){
    e.Handled = true;
}

but I cannot find anything like this in WPF...I figure you can probably do it, just need to do something fancy..

Thanks!

share|improve this question
8  
Why not just set IsReadOnly="True"? –  Rachel Aug 26 '11 at 16:23
    
If I could choose your comment as an answer, I would! Except checkboxes do not have an IsReadOnly property, so I used IsEnabled, which works even better, cause it greys out the box if it is no enabled. thanks! –  Toadums Aug 26 '11 at 17:13
    
I posted it as an answer :) Although you're right, I forgot CheckBoxes don't have the IsReadOnly property and you need to use IsEnabled instead –  Rachel Aug 26 '11 at 17:23
    
If you want the "clickable" state to be based on more complex logic, then your event idea affords this, but simply setting IsEnabled=False doesn't. You can fix this by binding IsEnabled to some property on the data context/"View Model". –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 26 '11 at 19:01
1  
Pretty funny that a comment recommending a property that doesn't exist get 8 upvotes :) I never see comment upvoting go this high in the WPF tag nowadays –  Fredrik Hedblad Aug 26 '11 at 19:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why not just set IsEnabled="False"?

share|improve this answer
    
IsEnabled makes the checkbox grayed out. Sometimes you want it to look that way, sometimes you don't. –  Bahri Gungor Aug 26 '11 at 18:36
1  
@Bahri: From a UX perspective, if you aren't allowed to check it, it should provide visual feedback. This jives with the rest of Windows, and consistency is also a good idea in UX. There's a reason it is the default behavior. If you don't like the graying, you can also re-style it. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Aug 26 '11 at 18:58
    
ya. it is actually more desirable greyed out! :) –  Toadums Aug 29 '11 at 4:49

You can have the check box disabled, and associate a style with the disabled check box, if the disabled look is a problem. As its already pointed in the previous posts, its good to have different looks for different states.

share|improve this answer

Only setting IsHitTestVisible="False" just takes care of the Mouse, the users can still use the KeyBoard to tab to the CheckBox and change the value.

You should set both IsHitTestVisible="False" and Focusable="False" to disable the KeyBoard as well

share|improve this answer
    
This is true. I forgot about the keyboard. –  Bahri Gungor Aug 26 '11 at 18:40

You can set IsHitTestVisible="False" to make it not respond to user clicks. Otherwise you can bind it to a command if viewmodel logic determines whether it is clickable.

<Grid>
    <CheckBox IsHitTestVisible="False" Content="I cannot be clicked at all"/>
<CheckBox Command="{Binding DoSomethingCommand}" Content="I can be clicked if DoSomethingCanExecute returns true."/>
</Grid>

In your DataContext (Viewmodel or otherwise):

    RelayCommand _DoSomethingCommand = null;

    public ICommand DoSomethingCommand
    {
        get
        {
            if (_DoSomethingCommand== null)
            {
                _DoSomethingCommand= new RelayCommand(
                    param => DoSomething(),
                    param => DoSomethingCanExecute
                    );
            }
            return _DoSomethingCommand;
        }
    }

    public bool DoSomethingCanExecute
    {
        get
        {
            return CheckboxShouldBeEnabled();
        }
    }

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        //Checkbox has been clicked
    }
share|improve this answer
    
mm, I am not using a DataContext. The checkboxes are just in the headers of treenodes, so that tree nodes can be checked/unchecked –  Toadums Aug 26 '11 at 17:14
    
I understand. You are missing out on a lot of the power of WPF by using the WinForms event driven programming paradigm, however. You might be surprised by the power of MVVM. –  Bahri Gungor Aug 26 '11 at 18:38

This might be a bit of an overkill, but you could sub-class CheckBox and then override the OnClick() method.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.