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I have two tables with identical schema in SQL Server 2008 R2. If I execute the following query, with parentheses intact, I get results from both tables.

/*
select distinct Name, Rank, SerNo, OtherStuff from 
*/

(
select Name, Rank, SerNo, OtherStuff from OldPlayers

union 
select Name, Rank, SerNo, OtherStuff from NewPlayers
)

/*
OldPlayers
*/

go

If I then uncomment both comments, and comment out the expression in parentheses, I also get results (from one table, of course).

If I now re-comment the table name at the end, and uncomment the parenthetical expression so that it can replace the table name, I get the error "Incorrect syntax near ')'."

Why can't I substitute the union expression for the table name?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you try it like this:

select Name, Rank, SerNo, OtherStuff from 
(
select Name, Rank, SerNo, OtherStuff from OldPlayers
union 
select Name, Rank, SerNo, OtherStuff from NewPlayers
) as Players
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3  
You don't need distinct as union already ensures this. –  Martin Smith Aug 26 '11 at 18:20
    
Worked! Thanks! –  Buggieboy Aug 26 '11 at 18:20

I don't have a copy of SQL Server handy, but isn't this always the case when you use an expression for a table as part of a query - the syntax requires you to name the resulting table (unless it is the outermost part of the query, such that the table name would refer to the table itself)? So if instead of a union query you used "Select 1" (I believe that is legal) you would still have to name the resulting "table".

So,

select distinct Name, Rank, SerNo, OtherStuff from 
(
select Name, Rank, SerNo, OtherStuff from OldPlayers
union 
select Name, Rank, SerNo, OtherStuff from NewPlayers
) SYNTAXREQUIRESTABLENAME

should work.

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