Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following MySQL query

SELECT e.id, IF(c.id = 1, g.url, e.url) AS url, IF(s.id = 4, c.short, s.name) AS sub, e.title, b.name AS category
FROM g, c, e, b, s
WHERE e.category = b.id
AND e.subcategory = s.id
AND g.c = c.id
AND (g.g = e.id OR s.id != 4)
AND e.`release` < UNIX_TIMESTAMP()
GROUP BY e.id
ORDER BY e.`release` DESC
LIMIT 15

This took about 2.5 seconds. But if I remove the GROUP BY, it takes about 1.8 seconds. If I remove ORDER BY, it takes 2.3 seconds. BUT if I remove GROUP BY and ORDER BY, it tooks about 0.005 seconds (but then there is many duplicate rows).

What should I do to get same results with faster time?

Here is the explain of the query, if it helps.

id  select_type     table   type    possible_keys   key     key_len     ref  rows   Extra
1   SIMPLE  c   ALL PRIMARY NULL    NULL    NULL    26  Using temporary; Using filesort
1   SIMPLE  g   ref console console 4   int41988_leveli.consoles.id 60  
1   SIMPLE  e   ALL PRIMARY,id  NULL    NULL    NULL    208 Using where; Using join buffer
1   SIMPLE  b   eq_ref  PRIMARY PRIMARY 4   e.cat   1   
1   SIMPLE  s   eq_ref  PRIMARY PRIMARY 4   e.subcategory   1

EDIT:

Here are the indexes that already exist.

c.id PRIMARY KEY
b.id PRIMARY KEY
e.id PRIMARY KEY
s.id PRIMARY KEY
g.id PRIMARY KEY
g.url AND g.console UNIQUE INDEX
share|improve this question
    
That query looks pretty optimal, horrible table/column names though. Is e.release indexed? –  Parris Varney Aug 26 '11 at 18:36
    
Can you show us the create table statements for these? In particular, which indexes already exist? –  Brad Aug 26 '11 at 18:44
    
I added the indexes to the question –  Ville Aug 27 '11 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

Try using single index on both fields: e.id and e.release. Or one index per each field: e.id and e.resourse, but I doubt it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Didn't help me, sorry :( –  Ville Aug 27 '11 at 15:54

How long does it take when you use DISTINCT in the SELECT clause?

share|improve this answer
    
It takes over 8 seconds... –  Ville Aug 27 '11 at 15:53

Try joining the tables one by one instead of the 5 of them all together and then restricting it with where. Start with most restricting joins, that is joining tables that produce fewer rows first.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.