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I am writing a program that does some batch processing. The batch elements can be processed independently of each other and we want to minimize overall processing time. So, instead of looping through each element in the batch one at a time, I am using an ExecutorService and submitting Callable objects to it:

    public void process(Batch batch)
    {
        ExecutorService execService = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
        CopyOnWriteArrayList<Future<BatchElementStatus>> futures = new CopyOnWriteArrayList<Future<BatchElementStatus>>();

        for (BatchElement element : batch.getElement())
        {
            Future<MtaMigrationStatus> future = execService.submit(new ElementProcessor(batch.getID(),
                    element));
            futures.add(future);
        }

        boolean done = false;

        while (!done)
        {
            for (Future<BatchElementStatus> future : futures)
            {
                try
                {
                    if (future.isDone())
                    {
                        futures.remove(future);
                    }
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    System.out.println(e.getMessage());
                }

                if (futures.size() == 0)
                {
                    done = true;
                }
            }
        }
    }

We want to be able to allow the batch processing to be cancelled. Because I'm not using a loop, I can't just check at the top each loop if a cancel flag has been set.

We are using a JMS topic to which both the BatchProcessor and ElementProcessor will be listening to inform them the batch has been cancelled.

There are a number of steps in the ElementProcess call() after which some of them the processing can be safely stopped but there's a point of no return. The class has this basic design:

public class ElementProcessor implements Callable, MessageListener
{
    private cancelled = false;

    public void onMessage(Message msg)
    {
        // get message object
        cancelled = true;
    }

    public BatchElementStatus call()
    {
        String status = SUCCESS;

        if (!cancelled)
        {
            doSomehingOne();
        }
        else
        {
            doRollback();
            status = CANCELLED;
        }            

        if (!cancelled)
        {
            doSomehingTwo();
        }
        else
        {
            doRollback();
            status = CANCELLED;
        }            

        if (!cancelled)
        {
            doSomehingThree();
        }
        else
        {
            doRollback();
            status = CANCELLED;
        }            

        if (!cancelled)
        {
            doSomehingFour();
        }
        else
        {
            doRollback();
            status = CANCELLED;
        }

        // After this point, we cannot cancel or pause the processing

        doSomehingFive();
        doSomehingSix();

        return new BatchElementStatus("SUCCESS");
    }

}

I'm wondering if there's a better way to check if the batch/element has been cancelled other than wrapping method calls/blocks of code in the call method in the if(!cancelled) statements.

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't think you can do much better than what you are currently doing, but here is an alternative:

public BatchElementStatus call() {
    return callMethod(1);
}

private callMethod(int methodCounter) {
    if (cancelled) {
       doRollback();
       return new BatchElementStatus("FAIL");
    }
    switch (methodCounter) {
       case 1 : doSomethingOne(); break;
       case 2 : doSomethingTwo(); break;
       ...
       case 5 : doSomethingFive();
                doSomethingSix();
                return new BatchElementStatus("SUCCESS");
    }
    return callMethod(methodCounter + 1);
}          

Also, you want to make cancelled volatile, since onMessage will be called from another thread. But you probably don't want to use onMessage and cancelled anyway (see below).

Other minor points: 1) CopyOnWriteArrayList<Future<BatchElementStatus>> futures should just be an ArrayList. Using a concurrent collection mislead us into thinking that futures is on many thread. 2) while (!done) should be replaced by while (!futures.isEmpty()) and done removed. 3) You probably should just call future.cancel(true) instead of "messaging" cancellation. You would then have to check if (Thread.interrupted()) instead of if (cancelled). If you want to kill all futures then just call execService.shutdownNow(); your tasks have to handle interrupts for this to work.

EDIT:

instead of your while(!done) { for (... futures) { ... }}, you should use an ExecutorCompletionService. It does what you are trying to do and it probably does it a lot better. There is a complete example in the API.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the use of the switch statement. It's a lot cleaner than the mutliple if/else statements. Thanks for the tip about using futures.isEmpty() instead of done. However, I'm not sure about your statement Using a concurrent collection mislead us into thinking that futures is on many thread. In an earlier version we were using just an ArrayList but get java.util.ConcurrentModificationExceptions. –  sdoca Aug 26 '11 at 22:13
    
Most of the time ConcurrentModificationException has nothing to do with "concurrency" (multithreading); it's just that you are using an iterator over the list and modifying the list while the iterator is being used. OK you still are removing the future from the list while iterating. –  toto2 Aug 26 '11 at 23:09
    
@sdoca see my edit concerning the while-loop and the futures list. –  toto2 Aug 26 '11 at 23:21
    
Thanks for the heads up about the ExecutorCompletionService, it's just what the doctor ordered! –  sdoca Aug 29 '11 at 17:18

Future has a cancel(boolean) method that will interrupt the running thread if true is passed in

so replace the if(!cancelled) checks with if(Thread.interrupted()) and return when you got a interrupt (you're not currently)

note that this will reset the interrupted flag to false (so if(Thread.interrupted()&&Thread.interrupted()) will be false) if you don't want to reset it use Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted() this maintains the flag for subsequent checks

or you can reset the flag to interrupted with Thread.currentThread().interrupt();

besides that use this inside the waiting while

for(Iterator<Future<MtaMigrationStatus>> it = futures.iterator();it.hasNext();){
    Future<MtaMigrationStatus> future = it.next();
    try
    {
        if (future.isDone())
        {
            it.remove();//<<--this avoids concurrent modification exception in the loop
        }
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
    }

}


if (futures.size() == 0)//outside the inner for loop and inside the while (or make the condition this) for micro-optimizing this check
{
    done = true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem with cancel method (on Futur or FutureTask) from the BatchProcess.ExecutorService is that it doesn't know if the ElementProcessor is past the point of no return or not. If it is past the point, then I can't let it be cancelled. If it can be cancelled, there's some cleanup that needs to be done and there's no way to initiate that. –  sdoca Aug 26 '11 at 21:47

Your ElementProcessor can extend from java.util.concurrent.FutureTask which is

A cancellable asynchronous computation. This class provides a base implementation of Future, with methods to start and cancel a computation, query to see if the computation is complete, and retrieve the result of the computation.

The FutureTask class is an implementation of Future that implements Runnable, and so may be executed by an Executor.

FutureTask has a cancel method which you can implement to do some cancel specific operations. Also, if FutureTask is canceled it will not be executed anymore, so you don't have to check always the status.

share|improve this answer
    
See my comment on ratchet freak's answer. –  sdoca Aug 26 '11 at 21:47

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