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How can I create an anonymous hash from an existing hash?

For arrays, I use:

@x = (1, 2, 3);
my $y = [@x];

but I can't find how to do the same for a hash:

my %x = ();
my $y = ???;

Thanks

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See perldoc perlreftut for a clear, brief explanation of all the basics of how to make and uses the more common types of references. –  Telemachus Apr 6 '09 at 12:26
    
Are you trying to make a copy that has nothing to do with the original hash so you can change them independently? –  brian d foy Apr 6 '09 at 13:18
    
$array = [0..5]; say $array->[0]; $hash = {0..5}; say $hash->{0}; –  Brad Gilbert Apr 6 '09 at 13:59

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted
my $new_hash = { %existing_hash };

Note that this solution does not make a deep copy. Read brian's answer for explanation.

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1  
This only works for single level data structures. –  Brad Gilbert Apr 6 '09 at 13:43
    
Thanks. I've edited the answer. –  Kaarel Apr 6 '09 at 14:02

Why do you need an anonymous hash? Although the answers tell you various ways you could make an anonymous hash, we have no idea if any of them are the right solution for whatever you are trying to do.

If you want a distinct copy that you can modify without disturbing the original data, use dclone from Storable, which comes with Perl. It creates a deep copy of your data structure:

use Storable qw(dclone);
my $clone = dclone \%hash;

Consider Dave Webb's answer, but with an additional layer of references. The value for the key of c is another hash reference:

use Data::Dumper;

my %original = ( a => 1, b => 2, c => { d => 1 } );
my $copy = { %original };

print 
	"Before change:\n\n",
	Data::Dumper->Dump( [ \%original], [ qw(*original) ] ),
	Data::Dumper->Dump( [ $copy ], [ qw(copy) ] ),
	;

$copy->{c}{d} = 'foo';

print 
	"\n\nAfter change:\n\n",
	Data::Dumper->Dump( [ \%original], [ qw(*original) ] ),
	Data::Dumper->Dump( [ $copy ], [ qw(copy) ] ),
	;

By inspecting the output, you see that even though you have an anonymous hash, it's still linked to the original:

Before change:

%original = (
			  'c' => {
					   'd' => 1
					 },
			  'a' => 1,
			  'b' => 2
			);
$copy = {
		  'c' => {
				   'd' => 1
				 },
		  'a' => 1,
		  'b' => 2
		};


After change:

%original = (
			  'c' => {
					   'd' => 'foo'
					 },
			  'a' => 1,
			  'b' => 2
			);
$copy = {
		  'c' => {
				   'd' => 'foo'
				 },
		  'a' => 1,
		  'b' => 2
		};
share|improve this answer
    
Damn. Now my attempt to clarify looks pointless and incomplete. –  Telemachus Apr 6 '09 at 13:34

I think you need to be careful here. Consider the following hash:

my %hash = (1 => 'one',2 => 'two');

There are two ways you can get a reference from this:

my $ref = \%hash;
my $anon = {%hash};

$ref is a reference to the original hash and can be used similarly to %hash. $anon is a reference to an anonymous copy of the original hash; it will have the same data but changing it won't change the original hash and vice versa.

So, for example, to start with both of these statements will have the same output

print $ref->{1},"\n";
> one
print $anon->{1},"\n";
> one

But if I change the original hash:

$hash{1} = "i";

They two print statements would output different values:

print $ref->{1},"\n";
> i
print $anon->{1},"\n";
> one
share|improve this answer
    
yes, yes, yes, i know, i just couldn't find the correct syntax in the documentation for {%h} –  Benoît Apr 6 '09 at 12:36

If you have

my %hash = ...

then you can do

my $hashref = \%hash;
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, that gives a reference to %hash, not an anonymous hash. –  Chas. Owens Apr 6 '09 at 12:57
    
Well, it's a bit of an XY problem. He's talking about a solution to problem he hasn't described, so we really don't know if and why he needs an anonymous hash. –  brian d foy Apr 6 '09 at 13:20
    
In fairness, as Brian's comment on the OP suggests, the question itself wasn't 100% clear. I originally thought he just wanted an anonymous hash (which he could do in one step), but he seems to want an anonymous copy of an existing hash. Adam thought he just wanted a reference to the hash. –  Telemachus Apr 6 '09 at 13:22

There seem to be two things going on here, and the answers are split between answering two different possible questions.

  1. You want an anonymous hash. Easy. You can do it in one step.
  2. You want an anonymous copy of an existing hash. As Dave Webb and brian suggest, this might be if you want a reference, but you don't want to tamper with the original hash. Also easy. (Well, not exactly: see brian's answer for details on deep copies.)

If you want 1, do this:

my $hash_ref = { foo => 1, bar => 2 };

If you want 2, do this:

my %hash = ( foo => 1, bar => 2 );

# Then later
my $anon_copy_hash_ref = { %hash };

(The names are not meant for prime time.) My copy isn't ready for prime time either. See brian's post for a fuller, more precise discussion.

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You're copy isn't a copy. :) –  brian d foy Apr 6 '09 at 13:33
    
Yup, I'll add a note in the post. –  Telemachus Apr 6 '09 at 13:47

Use:

$hashref = {};
share|improve this answer

A quick/easy way to achieve a deep copy:

use FreezeThaw qw(freeze thaw);
$new = thaw freeze $old;
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