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struct G{

    G&operator()(const int**a)
    {
       v<<a;
       std::copy(v.begin(),v.end(),std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
       return *this;
    }
    friend std::vector<int>&operator<<(std::vector<int>&v,const int** n);
    std::vector<int>v;
};

std::vector<int>&operator<<(std::vector<int>&v,const int** n)
{
    v.insert(v.begin(),*n,*n+sizeof(*n)/sizeof(*n[0]));
    return v;
}

/// use it
G g; 
int v[8]={1,2,3,4,5,6,5,4};
g(&v);

I have two questions, 1. The above code returns with error cannot convert parameter 1 from 'int (*)[8]' to 'const int **'
2. I would like to pass in g as g({1,2,3,4,5,6,5,4}) instead of g(&v). But I don't know how to do that and always wonder if g will accept it.
Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Try using something along the lines: template<size_t N> myFunction( int& myArray[N] )that way you can prevent it decaying to pointer to int in the function call. :) –  Shaktal Aug 27 '11 at 1:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
  1. &v is giving you the address of the array, when you want the address of a pointer. Try doing const int* x = v then g(&x).
  2. In C++0x, you can do this:

    G& operator()(std::initializer_list<const int>);
    g({1,2,3,4,5,6,5,4});
    
share|improve this answer

If you know you will always use a constant array of size 8,

struct G{

    G&operator()(int a[8])
    {
       v.reserve(8);
       v.insert(v.begin(), a, a + 8);
       std::copy(v.begin(),v.end(),std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
       return *this;
    }

    std::vector<int>v;
};

/// use it
G g; 
int v[8]={1,2,3,4,5,6,5,4};
g(v);

If not, you'll need to pass the size of the array along with the array:

struct G{

    G&operator()(int* a, int len)
    {
       v.reserve(len);
       v.insert(v.begin(), a, a + len);
       std::copy(v.begin(),v.end(),std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
       return *this;
    }

    std::vector<int>v;
};

/// use it
G g; 
int v[8]={1,2,3,4,5,6,5,4};
g(v, sizeof(v) / sizeof(int));

Or if you're always going to use compile time arrays (from the scope in which they were declared) rather than dynamic arrays,

struct G{

    template<unsigned int Len>
    G& operator()(int (&a)[Len])
    {
       v.reserve(Len);
       v.insert(v.begin(), a, a + Len);
       std::copy(v.begin(),v.end(),std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
       return *this;
    }

    std::vector<int>v;
};

/// use it
G g; 
int v[]={1,2,3,4,5,6,5,4};
g(v);

But note that the last version will generate a different version of operator() for every different size of array you pass it.

share|improve this answer
1  
If the code duplication with the template version becomes a problem, you can partially alleviate it by having it forward the array and it's size to the dynamic version, where the actual work will be done. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 27 '11 at 2:26

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