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I have a line shape that I have implemented the double click for, however the line is too thin. I would like to add a transparent white padding around it, so that it doesn't have to be clicked exactly on the line.

I really don't want to increase the stroke thickness, and I would like it to remain as shape since I do not want to put it in a content control, or a border.

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3 Answers 3

One way of doing this is to override the standard Hit Testing of this line. Unfortunately, the WPF's Line class is sealed, which I personally think is criminal :-)

Here is a piece of code that reproduces the Line behavior, but in another class, and defines a Tolerance property (default value is 5). Feel free to test it:

using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Media;
using System.Windows.Shapes;

namespace MyNamespace
{
    public class HitTolerantLine : Shape
    {
        public static readonly DependencyProperty X1Property = DependencyProperty.Register("X1", typeof(double), typeof(Line), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(0.0, FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.AffectsRender | FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.AffectsMeasure), new ValidateValueCallback(IsDoubleFinite));
        public static readonly DependencyProperty X2Property = DependencyProperty.Register("X2", typeof(double), typeof(Line), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(0.0, FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.AffectsRender | FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.AffectsMeasure), new ValidateValueCallback(IsDoubleFinite));
        public static readonly DependencyProperty Y1Property = DependencyProperty.Register("Y1", typeof(double), typeof(Line), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(0.0, FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.AffectsRender | FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.AffectsMeasure), new ValidateValueCallback(IsDoubleFinite));
        public static readonly DependencyProperty Y2Property = DependencyProperty.Register("Y2", typeof(double), typeof(Line), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(0.0, FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.AffectsRender | FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.AffectsMeasure), new ValidateValueCallback(IsDoubleFinite));
        public static readonly DependencyProperty ToleranceProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Tolerance", typeof(double), typeof(Line), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(5.0), new ValidateValueCallback(IsDoubleFinite));

        private LineGeometry _geometry;
        private static readonly Pen _strokePen;

        static HitTolerantLine()
        {
            _strokePen = new Pen(Brushes.Black, 1.0);
            _strokePen.Freeze();
        }

        protected override HitTestResult HitTestCore(PointHitTestParameters hitTestParameters)
        {
            HitTestResult res = base.HitTestCore(hitTestParameters);

            // didn't hit? let's add some tolerance
            if ((res == null) && (_geometry != null) && (Tolerance > 0))
            {
                if (_geometry.StrokeContains(_strokePen, hitTestParameters.HitPoint, Tolerance, ToleranceType.Absolute))
                {
                    res = new PointHitTestResult(this, hitTestParameters.HitPoint);
                }
            }
            return res;
        }

        protected virtual void DefineGeometry()
        {
            Point startPoint = new Point(X1, Y1);
            Point endPoint = new Point(X2, Y2);
            _geometry = new LineGeometry(startPoint, endPoint);
        }

        protected override Size MeasureOverride(Size constraint)
        {
            DefineGeometry();
            return base.MeasureOverride(constraint);
        }

        protected static bool IsDoubleFinite(object o)
        {
            double d = (double)o;
            return (!double.IsInfinity(d) && !double.IsNaN(d));
        }

        protected override Geometry DefiningGeometry
        {
            get
            {
                return _geometry;
            }
        }

        public double Tolerance
        {
            get
            {
                return (double)base.GetValue(ToleranceProperty);
            }
            set
            {
                base.SetValue(ToleranceProperty, value);
            }
        }

        [TypeConverter(typeof(LengthConverter))]
        public double X1
        {
            get
            {
                return (double) base.GetValue(X1Property);
            }
            set
            {
                base.SetValue(X1Property, value);
            }
        }

        [TypeConverter(typeof(LengthConverter))]
        public double X2
        {
            get
            {
                return (double) base.GetValue(X2Property);
            }
            set
            {
                base.SetValue(X2Property, value);
            }
        }

        [TypeConverter(typeof(LengthConverter))]
        public double Y1
        {
            get
            {
                return (double) base.GetValue(Y1Property);
            }
            set
            {
                base.SetValue(Y1Property, value);
            }
        }

        [TypeConverter(typeof(LengthConverter))]
        public double Y2
        {
            get
            {
                return (double) base.GetValue(Y2Property);
            }
            set
            {
                base.SetValue(Y2Property, value);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Simon Mourier thanks I will take a look at it. –  mihajlv Aug 27 '11 at 14:13
    
The code is valuable, but it seems to me an overkill. First off, for the code complexity, and secondly because it can be applied only to straight lines. The gradient trick works without any additional code, and on polylines, beziers, etc. –  Mario Vernari Aug 27 '11 at 16:39
    
@Mario - That's incorrect. StrokeContains supports any geometry. Override standard hit testing behavior is the official way of doing it. What you call "complexity" or "overkill" comes from the fact Line is sealed, which I insist is a stupid design decision from the WPF team. If it was not, it would be only 4 lines long. And not everyone wants to add a gradient to its shapes. –  Simon Mourier Aug 28 '11 at 6:34
    
Simon, I agree at all about the impossibility to derive from the basic shapes. This limitation hurt me as well, but we must live with it. I confirm that your code is valuable, but the gradient way is much more simpler than creating a bunch of different classes (and replace the native shapes). Whenever possible I try hard to keep the classes as they are, instead to deriving them. –  Mario Vernari Aug 28 '11 at 6:42

Padding area is not clickable.

Only way I can think of, given your restrictions is to increase stroke thickness and manage the stroke brush to be a gradient of transparent color and the visible color

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i am not quite sure how to set up the brush, since the color transition is based on coordinates running in a straight line. –  mihajlv Aug 27 '11 at 4:33
1  
another way would be to add another shape with more thickness and transparent color under the actual shape –  Schu Aug 27 '11 at 4:41
    
That's correct. Here is the linear gradient guide: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… Basically, you may set the thickness to 5.0 (supposing now it's 1.0), then define 6 stops for the gradient. The values (color/offset) as follows: Transparent/0.0; Transparent/0.39; Black/0.4; Black/0.6; Transparent/0.61; Transparent/1.0. –  Mario Vernari Aug 27 '11 at 4:43
    
@Schu i was thinking about that, but I want to remain as one shape, not a composite shape. –  mihajlv Aug 27 '11 at 5:02
    
@Mario Vernari thanks I was just checking that one out. –  mihajlv Aug 27 '11 at 14:08

Draw a transparent line on top with a larger StrokeThickness and apply the double click behaviour to that.

share|improve this answer
    
I am using my custom shape, and am overriding DefiningGeometry, none of the geomtry objects used to define the return geometry have StrokeThickness property. –  mihajlv Aug 27 '11 at 14:10

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