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The constructor NotePanel(itemClass) refers to the missing type itemClassI have a class NotePanel<T extends AbstractNoteItem> extends JPanel, and a method in a separate class that returns a NotePanel that should be created during the method:

public class NoteList extends JList {
    ...
    public class NoteListModel extends AbstractListModel {
        ...
        public NotePanel getPanelFromIndex(int index) {
            if (!indexExists(index)) {
                // FYI, indexExists(int) works fine
                return null;
            } else {
                AbstractNoteItem item = getElementAt(index);
                // FYI, getElementAt(int) works fine
                assert (item != null);  
                Class<?> itemClass = item.getClass();
                return (new NotePanel<itemClass> (item));
            }
        }
    }
}

There's an error on the line that returns a new NotePanel: "The constructor NotePanel(itemClass) refers to the missing type itemClass." Could somebody tell me how to make this work?

If this is not enough code, I would be happy to provide more. All my imports are in order (thank you, Organize Imports!). I don't see any glaringly obvious problems, but I'm also new to using generics.

Thanks in advance!

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You probably know why it doesn't work: type erasure. :) –  Ray Toal Aug 27 '11 at 5:37
    
Is there any particular reason why NotePanel needs to be generic? –  Stuart Cook Aug 27 '11 at 5:41
    
Yes; NotePanel requires a type that extends AbstractNoteItem, because AbstractNoteItem contains a method getTypeName() that returns a human-readable String, that is used as part of a JLabel text. Is there a way I could do this with just passing a Class<? extends AbstractNoteItem> or something similar? –  WChargin Aug 27 '11 at 18:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The below may or may not work. Here is a tutorial on generic methods.

public class NoteList extends JList {
    ...
    public class NoteListModel extends AbstractListModel {
        ...
        public < T extends AbstractNoteItem > NotePanel < T > getPanelFromIndex(int index) {
            if (!indexExists(index)) {
                // FYI, indexExists(int) works fine
                return null;
            } else {
                T item = ( T ) ( getElementAt(index) ) ; // this should generate a warning
                // FYI, getElementAt(int) works fine
                assert (item != null);  
                // not needed // Class<?> itemClass = item.getClass();
                return (new NotePanel<T> (item));
            }
        }
    } }

To invoke the method

class NoteItemImpl extends AbstractNoteItem { ... stuff ... }

Notelist notelist ; 
// implicit type argument specification
NotePanel < AbstractNoteItem > n1 = notelist . getPanelFromIndex ( 1 ) ;  
NotePanel < NoteItemImpl > n2 = notelist . getPanelFromIndex (2 ) ; // may generate class cast exception

// explicit type argument specification
NotePanel < AbstractNoteItem > n3 = notelist . < AbstractNoteItem > getPanelFromIndex ( 3 ) ;
NotePanel < NoteItemImpl > n4 = notelist . < NoteItemImpl > getPanelFromIndex ( 4 ) ; // may generate class cast exception
share|improve this answer
    
What's happening here? I don't understand. How are you taking a type parameter in a method? How would one call this method? I don't want NoteListModel to be a generic type. –  WChargin Aug 27 '11 at 19:16
    
Here is a link on generic methods download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/extra/generics/methods.html. I gave some invocation examples. NoteListModel is not a generic type - just one method. –  emory Aug 28 '11 at 1:50

What you are trying to do cannot work, because generic type arguments only exist at compile-time; they have no effect at run-time thanks to type erasure. It therefore makes no sense to use a Class<?> obtained at run-time as a generic type argument.

It's hard to suggest a proper alternative without knowing why you want NotePanel to be generic in the first place.

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You can only use a constant generic parameter. Here, could go as tight as AbstractNoteItem but nothing narrower.

Probably, doing

new NotePanel<AbstractNoteItem> (item)

would be ok and what you want, but without seeing the big picture, hard to say for sure.

Also, your return type is plain-old NotePanel, so parameterizing its construction won't matter much; whoever you're returning it to won't see the parameterization.

As mentioned in another answer, the key is that Java Generics are only at compile time. They're not like C++ templates which make different code, it's just a more exotic form of compile-time type-checking.

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new NotePanel<? extends AbstractNoteItem> (item) is not valid Java syntax –  newacct Aug 27 '11 at 10:15
    
^^^ you're right, ...editing. –  david van brink Aug 27 '11 at 12:22
    
Thanks, but no, this won't help, because I need access method that is specific to (overridden by) each subclass, so if I use new NotePanel<AbstractNoteItem> the method will always point to the method in AbstractNoteItem, and not its subclasses (right?). And I'm used to C++, so that's probably why this isn't working :) –  WChargin Aug 27 '11 at 18:30
    
To get access to the subclass methods, you'll need somewhere to downcast. But at present, your return method is just plain NotePanel, so whoever calls you wouldnt get to the subclass. You'll need to parameterize the return type somewhere. –  david van brink Aug 27 '11 at 19:25

If I understand this problem correctly, you have a NotePanel class that has a note item member. This note item is a subclass of AbstractNoteItem. But you don't want to give the note item the type AbstractNoteItem because you want direct access to the subclass methods.

Now if all of these subclass methods have the same names and same signatures (across the hierarchy) then you do not need generics at all; plain old polymorphism will work for you.

But if the subclass methods are quite different, then what you to want are separate NotePanel classes, one for each type of note item. In your question, you seem to want to generate them using generics. This isn't really possible in Java because of erasure. As mentioned in another answer, C++ generics will create multiple classes, but you don't get this in Java.

But if these separate NotePanel classes all have methods calling wildy different methods in each of the AbstractNoteItem subclases, then you will, I think, really need to write separate NotePanel subclasses! This parallel hierarchy of classes isn't really that bad if you need it.

If you go this route, then replace the call to your NoteItem constructor (the one you could not get to work) with a factory method that creates the right kind of NoteItem subclass.

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Your first paragraph is entirely correct; however, the problem is that even though the method signatures are the same, the methods are static - doesn't this mean that they aren't overridden, but rather hidden? The idea of separate NotePanel classes and factory methods is interesting, and it sounds like it would probably work, but I would like to a) be able to add more subclasses easily, and b) allow other developers to do the same (as this is more an engine than a standalone program), and they wouldn't be able to edit the NotePanel class (would they?). –  WChargin Aug 29 '11 at 4:10
    
Which are static methods? The methods inside the note item subclasses? If so, gather up all the commonality into the abstract classes and just code up the parallel class hierarchies. I'm not sure that in Java you can do much better. Is there any way you can make the methods with the same signature non-static? Are they static because someone else wrote them? Might you be able to make instance methods which are wrappers? –  Ray Toal Aug 29 '11 at 4:14

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