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I want to know (for debugging and logging) the size of an object in bytes, but not like

Sizeof (Object)

but like a 'deep sizeof'. For example if the object contains a hash map or a list, the real size needed by that hash map or list should be added to the result. Is there any way to do this without having to add a

property Size : LongWord read GetByteSize;

to each and every little object?

Probably a stupid question, but I'll give it a try ;)

EDIT: Just found almost the same question:

Recursive Class Instance Size in Delphi

I guess, the question can be closed. Sorry about that!

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Wouldn't be a good idea to add Delphi in the question name? –  bogdan Dec 10 '09 at 16:42
    
That's what tags are for...I consider it kind of redundant to add the programming language both as a tag and to include it in the title of EVERY question. Probably a matter of taste. –  jpfollenius Dec 10 '09 at 18:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, you need to write the code for this yourself.

Not sure of this works, but you can become very dirty:

  • Find the object size in bytes. Using TObject.InstanceSize.
  • Cast each group of 4 bytes to a pointer and then check if it is a TObject. You should be able to do that. If it is a TObject, you should repeat the step.
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I was afraid of that...I have to make changes all over the place which I wanted to avoid...DAMN g...thanks anyway! –  jpfollenius Apr 6 '09 at 13:00
    
Added a possible solution, but it is very dirty and i'm not sure if you can do that. –  Toon Krijthe Apr 6 '09 at 13:06
    
Um, it's harder than that. You have to consider circular references, interfaces, and data which looks like an object but in fact is not. I think you'll find this difficult/impossible to perform successfully. –  Craig Stuntz Apr 6 '09 at 13:18
    
good idea...what about strings and dynamic arrays? –  jpfollenius Apr 6 '09 at 13:19
    
sorry, missed your comment, Craig. Sounds like its not worth the effort considering all potential problems. Maybe I'll give it a try anyway... –  jpfollenius Apr 6 '09 at 13:21

Since this is for debugging, have you looked at the FastMM4 memory allocator? It's got some nice stuff for tracing memory leaks.

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I'm not looking for memory leaks but for the size of certain internal data structures since the size varies with the input data. –  jpfollenius Apr 7 '09 at 6:15

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