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I have a JFrame which contains 2 JPanel subclass and 2 JLabel in BorderLayout. One of the JPanel contains JButtons and the other is used for displaying graphics. The JLabels are in north and south, the button JPanel in the west and the display JPanel in center.

The display JPanel requires constant refresh, so i invoke its repaint() method via the action event generated by swing timer. I also override its paintComponent() method to do my drawings.

Instead of displaying what i have drawn, the "content of the JFrame" is being drawn onto the display JPanel. I am aware that i can simply "clear" the display JPanel by using g.fillRect() or super.paintComponent() before doing my drawings.

I am just curious why this happens.

i'm using jdk 1.6u27. below is my code:

package test;

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.event.*;

public class Main {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Simulation sim = new Simulation();

    }
}

class Simulation extends JFrame {

    public JLabel state;
    private JLabel id;
    private ButtonPanel control;
    private Display display;

    public Simulation() {
        id = new JLabel("Test");
        state = new JLabel("Test");
        control = new ButtonPanel();
        display = new Display(this);

        this.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
        this.add(id, BorderLayout.NORTH);
        this.add(control, BorderLayout.WEST);
        this.add(display, BorderLayout.CENTER);
        this.add(state, BorderLayout.SOUTH);

        this.setSize(500, 600);
        this.setVisible(true);
        this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

    }

    public ButtonPanel getControl() {
        return this.control;
    }
}

class ButtonPanel extends JPanel implements ActionListener {

    public JButton b[] = new JButton[8];
    public boolean bp[] = new boolean[8];

    public ButtonPanel() {
        this.setLayout(new GridLayout(8, 1));

        for (int i = 0; i < b.length; i++) {
            b[i] = new JButton(""+i);
            b[i].addActionListener(this);
            bp[i] = false;
            this.add(b[i]);
        }
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        //do something
    }
}

class Display extends JPanel implements ActionListener {

    private Timer tm;
    private int yco;
    private Simulation sim;

    public Display(Simulation sim) {
        tm = new Timer(100, this);
        tm.start();

        yco = 0;

        this.sim = sim;
    }

    @Override
    public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        //draw something
        g.drawLine(0, yco, 100, 100);
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        yco ++;
        this.repaint();
    }
}

screenshot

share|improve this question
    
+1 for sscce. – trashgod Aug 27 '11 at 8:35

Without super.paintComponent(g), the result depends on your platform's default for the opacity property of the JPanel UI delegate, PanelUI. Mine happens to be true, but you can experiment on your platform, as suggested below.

Addendum: "If you do not honor the opaque property you will likely see visual artifacts."—paintComponent(). The artifact you observe will vary by platform, but it is not atypical. In effect, you are breaking the promise to draw every pixel, and you see whatever is left over in some buffer.

Main

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import javax.swing.*;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                Simulation sim = new Simulation();
            }
        });
    }
}

class Simulation extends JFrame {

    public JCheckBox state;
    private JLabel id;
    private ButtonPanel control;
    private Display display;

    public Simulation() {
        id = new JLabel("Test");
        state = new JCheckBox("Opaque");
        control = new ButtonPanel();
        display = new Display(this);

        this.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
        this.add(id, BorderLayout.NORTH);
        this.add(control, BorderLayout.WEST);
        this.add(display, BorderLayout.CENTER);
        this.add(state, BorderLayout.SOUTH);
        state.addItemListener(new ItemListener() {

            @Override
            public void itemStateChanged(ItemEvent e) {
                display.setOpaque(e.getStateChange() == ItemEvent.SELECTED);
            }
        });
        state.setSelected(true);

        this.pack();
        this.setVisible(true);
        this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    }

    public ButtonPanel getControl() {
        return this.control;
    }
}

class ButtonPanel extends JPanel {

    private static final int N = 8;
    private List<JToggleButton> list = new ArrayList<JToggleButton>(N);

    public ButtonPanel() {
        this.setLayout(new GridLayout(0, 1));
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
            final JToggleButton b = new JToggleButton(String.valueOf(i));
            b.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {

                @Override
                public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                    //System.out.println(b.isSelected());
                }
            });
            list.add(b);
            this.add(b);
        }
    }
}

class Display extends JPanel {

    private Simulation sim;
    private Timer tm;
    private int yco;

    public Display(Simulation sim) {
        this.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(320, 320));
        this.setOpaque(true);
        this.sim = sim;
        tm = new Timer(100, new ActionListener() {

            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                yco++;
                repaint();
            }
        });
        tm.start();
    }

    @Override
    public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        //super.paintComponent(g);
        g.drawLine(0, yco, getWidth() / 2, getHeight() / 2);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
In general, you should call super.paintComponent(g) or "the container's lightweight descendents won't show up." – trashgod Aug 27 '11 at 9:09
2  
See also Main Thread vs. UI Thread in Java. – trashgod Aug 27 '11 at 16:25
    
I see, i did not know that there was such an option, thanks for the explanation. But my problem is actually the content of the JFrame is being drawn onto the display JPanel. For example, the top label and side buttons is being drawn onto the display JPanel, along with those black lines. – C.K. Aug 29 '11 at 3:57
    
I read the post you mentioned and this link. I'm not sure if the problem is caused by thread safety. I will try to post a screenshot to make my question clearer. – C.K. Aug 29 '11 at 4:23
1  
@b1naryatr0phy: JComponent provides paintComponent(); paintComponents() is inherited from the parent Container. – trashgod May 11 '13 at 15:46

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