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I write C code with visual studio 2008.I want to place varibles "inside" the code.Like this

 int   main()
{
    foo();
    int i;
    foo(i)
    return 0;
}

Can I do it ? For now this generates compile errors,despite that I compile it with /Tp option

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closed as not a real question by Oliver Charlesworth, Bertrand Marron, therefromhere, Hans Passant, yoda Aug 27 '11 at 16:49

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Well, your code has at least two other errors, even in C99! Plus, /Tp specifies that the file is C++. –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 27 '11 at 11:58
    
What c99 did not introduce function overloading! –  Joe Aug 27 '11 at 12:01
1  
Assuming that you're using Visual Studio, /Tp is used to specify to the compiler that the input file is a C++ source file. C99 is not supported by Visual Studio. –  Bertrand Marron Aug 27 '11 at 12:02
    
I compile it with /Tp because I thought it will give me an option to define varibles inside the code –  Yakov Aug 27 '11 at 12:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Compile as C++. Or, perhaps, use this ugly trick with an extra block:

int main()
{
    foo();
    {
        int i;
        fum(i);
    }
    return 0;
}
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1  
IMO, this trick isn't "ugly". I use it all the time when I want to limit the scope of a variable. –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 27 '11 at 12:28

Visual Studio does not support C99, so to do what you want you either have to compile it as C++ or use a different compiler (such as the MinGW toolset).

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