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How to find out the units digit of a certain number (e.g. 3 power 2011). What logic should I use to find the answer to this problem?

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which language are you using? –  Javed Akram Aug 27 '11 at 12:12
5  
This has nothing to do with a language and I am just interested in finding out the logic to solve this in the simplest fashion. Just interested in the units digit of such a large number, not necessarily in the answer –  user915435 Aug 27 '11 at 12:13
    
Added pseudocode tag to this... and does this help you at all? –  DaveRandom Aug 27 '11 at 12:22
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9 Answers

I'm sure there's a proper mathematical way to solve this, but I would suggest that since you only care about the last digit and since in theory every number multiplied by itself repeatedly should generate a repeating pattern eventually (when looking only at the last digit), you could simply perform the multiplications until you detect the first repetition and then map your exponent into the appropriate position in the pattern that you built.

Note that because you only care about the last digit, you can further simplify things by truncating your input number down to its ones-digit before you start building your pattern mapping. This will let you to determine the last digit even for arbitrarily large inputs that would otherwise cause an overflow on the first or second multiplication.

Here's a basic example in JavaScript: http://jsfiddle.net/dtyuA/2/

And the last digit in 3^2011 is 7, by the way.

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That pretty much is the proper mathematical way to solve it. –  Tom Zych Aug 27 '11 at 12:35
    
Neat. I learned a math thing thanks to this question. –  aroth Aug 27 '11 at 12:39
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Uh oh. Soon you'll be staying up all hours proving theorems, pondering the Riemann zeta function, and maybe even playing Go. Before long you'll be a gibbering wreck, muttering about Laplace transforms and triple integrals. Run away while you can! –  Tom Zych Aug 27 '11 at 12:47
    
voted up for the nice javascript example –  bosonix Aug 27 '11 at 15:19
    
@Tom: You can refer to my answer for the "generalized" mathematical solution, which fortunately is already build upon several number theory concepts and thus will hopefully avoid the described chaotic scenario (lol). –  Rafael Almeida Aug 27 '11 at 15:53
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You should look at Modular exponentiation. What you want is the same of calculating n^e (mod m) with m = 10. That is the same thing as calculating the remainder of the division by ten of n^e.

You are probably interested in the Right-to-left binary method to calculate it, since it's the most time-efficient one and the easiest not too hard to implement. Here is the pseudocode, from Wikipedia:

function modular_pow(base, exponent, modulus)
    result := 1
    while exponent > 0
        if (exponent & 1) equals 1:
           result = (result * base) mod modulus
        exponent := exponent >> 1
        base = (base * base) mod modulus
    return result

After that, just call it with modulus = 10 for you desired base and exponent and there's your answer.

EDIT: for an even simpler method, less efficient CPU-wise but more memory-wise, check out the Memory-efficient section of the article on Wikipedia. The logic is straightforward enough:

function modular_pow(base, exponent, modulus)
    c := 1
    for e_prime = 1 to exponent 
        c := (c * base) mod modulus
    return c
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For base 3:

3^1 = 3
3^2 = 9
3^3 = 27
3^4 = 81
3^5 = 243
3^6 = 729
3^7 = 2187
...

That is the units digit has only 4 possibilities and then it repeats in ever the same cycle.

With the help of Euler's theorem we can show that this holds for any integer n, meaning their units digit will repeat after at most 4 consecutive exponents. Looking only at the units digit of an arbitrary product is equivalent to taking the remainder of the multiplication modulo 10, for example:

2^7 % 10 = 128 % 10 = 8 

It can also be shown (and is quite intuitive) that for an arbitrary base, the units digit of any power will only depend on the units digit of the base itself - that is 2013^2013 has the same units digit as 3^2013.

We can exploit both facts to come up with an extremely fast algorithm (thanks for the help - with kind permission I may present a much faster version).

The idea is this: As we know that for any number 0-9 there will be at most 4 different outcomes, we can as well store them in a lookup table:

{ 0,0,0,0, 1,1,1,1, 6,2,4,8, 1,3,9,7, 6,4,6,4, 
  5,5,5,5, 6,6,6,6, 1,7,9,3, 6,8,4,2, 1,9,1,9 }

That's the possible outcomes for 0-9 in that order, grouped in fours. The idea is now for an exponentiation n^a to

  • first take the base mod 10 => := i
  • go to index 4*i in our table (it's the starting offset of that particular digit)
  • take the exponent mod 4 => := off (as stated by Euler's theorem we only have four possible outcomes!)
  • add off to 4*i to get the result

Now to make this as efficient as possible, some tweaks are applied to the basic arithmetic operations:

  • Multiplying by 4 is equivalent to shifting two to the left ('<< 2')
  • Taking a number a % 4 is equivalent to saying a&3 (masking the 1 and 2 bit, which form the remainder % 4)

The algorithm in C:

static int table[] = {
    0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 6, 2, 4, 8, 1, 3, 9, 7, 6, 4, 6, 4, 
    5, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 6, 1, 7, 9, 3, 6, 8, 4, 2, 1, 9, 1, 9
};

int /* assume n>=0, a>0 */ 
unit_digit(int n, int a)
{
    return table[((n%10)<<2)+(a&3)];
}

Proof for the initial claims

From observing we noticed that the units digit for 3^x repeats every fourth power. The claim was that this holds for any integer. But how is this actually proven? As it turns out that it's quite easy using modular arithmetic. If we are only interested in the units digit, we can perform our calculations modulo 10. It's equivalent to say the units digit cycles after 4 exponents or to say

a^4 congruent 1 mod 10

If this holds, then for example

a^5 mod 10 = a^4 * a^1 mod 10 = a^4 mod 10 * a^1 mod 10 = a^1 mod 10

that is, a^5 yields the same units digit as a^1 and so on.

From Euler's theorem we know that

a^phi(10) mod 10 = 1 mod 10

where phi(10) is the numbers between 1 and 10 that are co-prime to 10 (i.e. their gcd is equal to 1). The numbers < 10 co-prime to 10 are 1,3,7 and 9. So phi(10) = 4 and this proves that really a^4 mod 10 = 1 mod 10.

The last claim to prove is that for exponentiations where the base is >= 10 it suffices to just look at the base's units digit. Lets say our base is x >= 10, so we can say that x = x_0 + 10*x_1 + 100*x_2 + ... (base 10 representation)

Using modular representation it's easy to see that indeed

x ^ y mod 10
= (x_0 + 10*x_1 + 100*x_2 + ...) ^ y mod 10
= x_0^y + a_1 * (10*x_1)^y-1 + a_2 * (100*x_2)^y-2 + ... + a_n * (10^n) mod 10
= x_0^y mod 10  

where a_i are coefficients that include powers of x_0 but finally not relevant since the whole product a_i * (10 * x_i)^y-i will be divisible by 10.

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It works the same for any arbitrary base. Just truncate it to its last digit and apply the same algorithm. –  aroth Aug 27 '11 at 12:29
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We can start by inspecting the last digit of each result obtained by raising the base 10 digits to successive powers:

d      d^2    d^3    d^4    d^5    d^6    d^7    d^8    d^9 (mod 10)
---    ---    ---    ---    ---    ---    ---    ---    ---
0      0      0      0      0      0      0      0      0
1      1      1      1      1      1      1      1      1
2      4      8      6      2      4      8      6      2
3      9      7      1      3      9      7      1      3
4      6      4      6      4      6      4      6      4
5      5      5      5      5      5      5      5      5
6      6      6      6      6      6      6      6      6
7      9      3      1      7      9      3      1      7
8      4      2      6      8      4      2      6      8
9      1      9      1      9      1      9      1      9

We can see that in all cases the last digit cycles through no more than four distinct values. Using this fact, and assuming that n is a non-negative integer and p is a positive integer, we can compute the result fairly directly (e.g. in Javascript):

function lastDigit(n, p) {
    var d = n % 10;
    return [d, (d*d)%10, (d*d*d)%10, (d*d*d*d)%10][(p-1) % 4];
}

... or even more simply:

function lastDigit(n, p) {
    return Math.pow(n % 10, (p-1) % 4 + 1) % 10;
}

lastDigit(3, 2011)
/* 7 */

The second function is equivalent to the first. Note that even though it uses exponentiation, it never works with a number larger than nine to the fourth power (6561).

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In your second function, why are you doing n % 10? –  samoz Aug 28 '11 at 15:41
    
@samoz n % 10 makes the function work for numbers with more than one digit. If the input is restricted to a single digit, then it is not necessary. –  WReach Aug 28 '11 at 15:52
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The key to solving this type of question lies in Euler's theorem.

This theorem allows us to say that a^phi(m) mod m = 1 mod m, if and only if a and m are coprime. That is, a and m do not divide evenly. If this is the case, (and for your example it is), we can solve the problem on paper, without any programming what so ever.

Let's solve for the unit digit of 3^2011, as in your example. This is equivalent to 3^2011 mod 10.

The first step is to check is 3 and 10 are co-prime. They do not divide evenly, so we can use Euler's theorem.

We also need to compute what the totient, or phi value, is for 10. For 10, it is 4. For 100 phi is 40, 1000 is 4000, etc.

Using Euler's theorem, we can see that 3^4 mod 10 = 1. We can then re-write the original example as:

3^2011 mod 10 = 3^(4*502 + 3) mod 10 = 3^(4*502) mod 10 + 3^3 mod 10 = 1^502 * 3^3 mod 10 = 27 mod 10 = 7

Thus, the last digit of 3^2011 is 7.

As you saw, this required no programming whatsoever and I solved this example on a piece of scratch paper.

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+1 for Euler's theorem. If you take advantage of it and precalculate the four possible values for 2, 3 and 7, you can do it even faster than this (see my try at it). –  emboss Aug 28 '11 at 16:23
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Bellow is a table with the power and the unit digit of 3 to that power.
0 1
1 3
2 9
3 7
4 1
5 3
6 9
7 7

Using this table you can see that the unit digit can be 1, 3, 9, 7 and the sequence repeats in this order for higher powers of 3. Using this logic you can find that the unit digit of (3 power 2011) is 7. You can use the same algorithm for the general case.

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Here's a trick that works for numbers that aren't a multiple of a factor of the base (for base 10, it can't be a multiple of 2 or 5.) Let's use base 3. What you're trying to find is 3^2011 mod 10. Find powers of 3, starting with 3^1, until you find one with the last digit 1. For 3, you get 3^4=81. Write the original power as (3^4)^502*3^3. Using modular arithmetic, (3^4)^502*3^3 is congruent to (has the same last digit as) 1^502*3^3. So 3^2011 and 3^3 have the same last digit, which is 7.

Here's some pseudocode to explain it in general. This finds the last digit of b^n in base B.

// Find the smallest power of b ending in 1.
i=1
while ((b^i % B) != 1) {
    i++
}
// b^i has the last digit 1

a=n % i
// For some value of j, b^n == (b^i)^j * b^a, which is congruent to b^a
return b^a % B

You'd need to be careful to prevent an infinite loop, if no power of b ends in 1 (in base 10, multiples of 2 or 5 don't work.)

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Find out the repeating set in this case, it is 3,9,7,1 and it repeats in the same order for ever....so divide 2011 by 4 which will give you a reminder 3. That is the 3rd element in the repeating set. This is the easiest way to find for any given no. say if asked for 3^31, then the reminder of 31/4 is 3 and so 7 is the unit digit. for 3^9, 9/4 is 1 and so the unit will be 3. 3^100, the unit will be 1.

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You ppl are making simple thing complicated.

Suppose u want to find out the unit digit of abc ^ xyz .

divide the power xyz by 4,if remainder is 1 ans is c^1=c.
 if xyz%4=2 ans is unit digit of  c^2.
 else if xyz%4=3 ans is unit digit of  c^3.

 if xyz%4=0 
 then we need to check whether c is 5,then ans is 5
  if c is even ans is 6
 if c is odd (other than 5 ) ans is 1.
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