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For example:

class Example
{
public:
    explicit Example(int n) : num(n) {}
    void addAndPrint(vector<int>& v) const
    {
        for_each(v.begin(), v.end(), [num](int n) { cout << num + n << " "; });
    }
private:
    int num;
};

int main()
{
    vector<int> v = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 };

    Example ex(1);
    ex.addAndPrint(v);
    return 0;
}

When you compile and run this in MSVC2010 you get the following error:

error C3480: 'Example::num': a lambda capture variable must be from an enclosing function scope

However, with g++ 4.6.2 (prerelease) you get:

1 2 3 4 5

Which compiler is right according to the standard draft?

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3  
Note that you have to capture this by value here, not num. When you use num, you're really using this->num. Also please note that MSVC doesn't implement the C++11 wording of lambdas, since it changed after 2008 when they implemented all this. –  Alexandre C. Aug 27 '11 at 12:54
    
@Alexandre: Capturing this is effectively the same as capturing num by reference. That seems to not be what's desired here. –  Ben Voigt Aug 27 '11 at 14:33
    
@Ben: good point. However the result is the same here, since the closure doesn't escape addAndPrint's scope (and the whole thing is likely to get inlined here anyway). 5.1.2 as quoted by @dimitri seems to indicate that MSVC is right, since num isn't a variable with automatic storage duration. This behavior is quite weird however. –  Alexandre C. Aug 27 '11 at 15:28
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

5.1.2/9:

The reaching scope of a local lambda expression is the set of enclosing scopes up to and including the innermost enclosing function and its parameters.

and 5.1.2/10:

The identifiers in a capture-list are looked up using the usual rules for unqualified name lookup (3.4.1); each such lookup shall find a variable with automatic storage duration declared in the reaching scope of the local lambda expression.

As num is neither declared in any function scope nor has automatic storage duration, it cannot be captured. Thus VS is right and g++ is wrong.

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Thanks for the clarification. I found out that the g++ 4.6.2 has a few bugs regarding captures, for example [=, this] also compiles, and they plan on fixing them for 4.7.0. –  Jesse Good Aug 28 '11 at 10:53
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Standard says the following (5.1.2):

The identifiers in a capture-list are looked up using the usual rules for unqualified name lookup (3.4.1); each such lookup shall find a variable with automatic storage duration declared in the reaching scope of the local lambda expression.

To my understanding GCC compiler is right because 'num' is in the reaching scope at the point of lambda declaration.

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2  
It's not enough to be in scope, it has to be a variable with automatic storage duration. –  Ben Voigt Aug 27 '11 at 14:32
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