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I have the following pseudo code:

class A:
    mutex lockForB

class B:
    def __init__(self, A): //the type of A is class A
        lock(A.lockForB)
        # ...
        unlock(A.lockForB)

    # other function have the same locking

I understand from oop point of view it is very bad idea to use such design, but if I create lock inside class B I will not be able to put lock on creator of the class B. Is there any better design for this? Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have no idea what you're trying to accomplish. It's unlikely that a class level lock is what you want but your pseudocode is not so far from the actual code so I'll just fill in the blanks. Honestly, without some idea what you're attempting to synchronize access to it's going to be a challenge to help you.

class A:
    lockForB = threading.RLock()

class B:
    def __init__(self): 
        with A.lockForB:
            # do init stuff

    def othermethod(self):
        with A.lockForB:
            # do other stuff

So that code will work. lockForB is just a class level attribute on A so it is shared between all instances of A. However, in cases where I've seen folks use class level locks like this it is usually to prevent the class that owns the lock from being put into an inconsistent state where you have 2 seemingly unrelated classes sharing a lock.

Without context to help understand what you're attempting to synchronize access to it's really hard to tell you why this couldn't be written like this:

class C:
    lock = threading.RLock()
    def __init__(self):
        with self.lock:
            # do stuff
    def othermethod(self):
        with self.lock:
            # do other stuff
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In general you should put locks only around the boundaries of critical sections or the use of shared resources. You should consider what it is you're trying to protect from simultaneous access and protect it. If, for instance, class A has a Queue into which items are placed and read from, then it's the access to this particular resource you should protect. Since OOP dictates that this kind of resource should only be accessed by the class methods, only class A should protect it:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kws):
        # do the initialization
        self._my_queue = Queue()
        self._lock = Lock()

    def do_something(self):
        # do initial calculations
        self._lock.acquire()
        item = self._my_queue.get()
        self._lock.release()
        # do other things

Hence forth, class B should call class A methods and it will be thread safe. If class B has its own critical sections It's quite alright to use more than a single lock:

class B(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kws):
        # do the initialization
        self._lock = Lock()
        self.a = A()

    def do_something_with_a(self):
        # initial calculations
        self._lock.acquire()
        # Critical section
        result = self.a.do_something()
        # do something with result
        self._lock.release()
        # continue the code

This way each class protects its own critical sections and shared resources and there's no need to break the class interface.

If you need to protect the C'tor of a class then you either need a global lock for the module, created and initialized outside the scope of the class, or to add the lock to the Class object (like a static member in C++ and Java) rather than the instance itself:

class B(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kws):
        if not hasattr(self.__class__, "_lock"):
            self.__class__._lock = Lock()
        # works with Python 2.6+ for earlier version use try-finally
        with self.__class__._lock: 
            # Your initialization

This will protect your C'tor

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