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TMyBaseClass=class
  constructor(test:integer);
end;

TMyClass=class(TMyBaseClass);

TClass1<T: TMyBaseClass,constructor>=class()
  public
    FItem: T;
    procedure Test;
end;

procedure TClass1<T>.Test;
begin
  FItem:= T.Create;
end;

var u: TClass1<TMyClass>;
begin
  u:=TClass1<TMyClass>.Create();
  u.Test;
end;

How do I make it to create the class with the integer param. What is the workaround?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Just typecast to the correct class:

type
  TMyBaseClassClass = class of TMyBaseClass;

procedure TClass1<T>.Test;
begin
  FItem:= T(TMyBaseClassClass(T).Create(42));
end;

Also it's probably a good idea to make the constructor virtual.

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This is the best way I have seen to solve the problem. Interestingly I looked in my own code, attempted to change to this approach and realised that sometimes runtime decisions are made as to what class to create which means that the approach outlined in my answer has a use. I have therefore left that answer there in case it's useful to anyone. –  David Heffernan Aug 27 '11 at 19:49
    
@David Thanks! Do you think the final typecast from your edit: T(...) is necessary? I don't see why; the returned instance has to be and will be of type T, by definition. Is there something I'm missing? Thanks! –  TOndrej Aug 27 '11 at 19:49
    
It is necessary. TMyBaseClassClass(T).Create returns a new instance of TMyBaseClass, but it needs to return T which is a more specialised class. –  David Heffernan Aug 27 '11 at 19:51
    
Also I think you answer would be much much stronger without the alternative. The first block of code just nails it completely. But hey, that's just my opinion. –  David Heffernan Aug 27 '11 at 19:53
    
@David Right, thanks. –  TOndrej Aug 27 '11 at 19:58

You might consider giving the base class an explicit method for initialization instead of using the constructor:

TMyBaseClass = class
public
  procedure Initialize(test : Integer); virtual;
end;  

TMyClass = class(TMyBaseClass)
public
  procedure Initialize(test : Integer); override;
end;

procedure TClass1<T>.Test;
begin
  FItem:= T.Create;
  T.Initialize(42);
end;

Of course this only works, if the base class and all subclasses are under your control.

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+1 this is a good solution until you want to be able to create instances of T outside the generic class. –  David Heffernan Aug 27 '11 at 18:53
    
@David one could offer the constructor with the integer parameter in addition to the Initialize method. –  jpfollenius Aug 27 '11 at 18:57
    
That would still leaves clients the opportunity to call parameterless constructor and omit calling Initialize which would be an error. Of course you could defend against that internal to the class, but it would be messy. If you adopt the approach you suggest (and as I suggested at almost identical moment), then I would prefer the constructor to be private. So far as I can tell, there is no good solution to this problem and it's rather depressing if that is so. –  David Heffernan Aug 27 '11 at 19:02

Update

The solution offered by @TOndrej is far superior to what I wrote below, apart from one situation. If you need to take runtime decisions as to what class to create, then the approach below appears to be the optimal solution.


I've refreshed my memory of my own code base which also deals with this exact problem. My conclusion is that what you are attempting to achieve is impossible. I'd be delighted to be proved wrong if anyone wants to rise to the challenge.

My workaround is for the generic class to contain a field FClass which is of type class of TMyBaseClass. Then I can call my virtual constructor with FClass.Create(...). I test that FClass.InheritsFrom(T) in an assertion. It's all depressingly non-generic. As I said, if anyone can prove my belief wrong I will upvote, delete, and rejoice!

In your setting the workaround might look like this:

TMyBaseClass = class
public
  constructor Create(test:integer); virtual;
end;
TMyBaseClassClass = class of TMyBaseClass;

TMyClass = class(TMyBaseClass)
public
  constructor Create(test:integer); override;
end;

TClass1<T: TMyBaseClass> = class
private
  FMemberClass: TMyBaseClassClass;
  FItem: T;
public
  constructor Create(MemberClass: TMyBaseClassClass); overload;
  constructor Create; overload;
  procedure Test;
end;

constructor TClass1<T>.Create(MemberClass: TMyBaseClassClass);
begin
  inherited Create;
  FMemberClass := MemberClass;
  Assert(FMemberClass.InheritsFrom(T));
end;

constructor TClass1<T>.Create;
begin
  Create(TMyBaseClassClass(T));
end;

procedure TClass1<T>.Test;
begin
  FItem:= T(FMemberClass.Create(666));
end;

var 
  u: TClass1<TMyClass>;
begin
  u:=TClass1<TMyClass>.Create(TMyClass);
  u.Test;
end;

Another more elegant solution, if it is possible, is to use a parameterless constructor and pass in the extra information in a virtual method of T, perhaps called Initialize.

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Yes i know, it's not possible in C# also. But i'm searching for a workaround here. –  netboy Aug 27 '11 at 16:50
    
[DCC Error]: E2010 Incompatible types: 'TMyClass' and 'TMyBaseClass' –  netboy Aug 27 '11 at 17:00
    
OK, I think I can guess what that error is about. You need to cast the result of the constuctor to T. See my code. –  David Heffernan Aug 27 '11 at 17:06
    
no, same error :( –  netboy Aug 27 '11 at 17:29
    
I can't tell what you are doing wrong. I can't see your code. My code, given above, works. Oh, I just fixed a couple of little typos, but you would have fixed them too. –  David Heffernan Aug 27 '11 at 17:38

What seems to work in Delphi XE, is to call T.Create first, and then call the class-specific Create as a method afterwards. This is similar to Rudy Velthuis' (deleted) answer, although I don't introduce an overloaded constructor. This method also seems to work correctly if T is of TControl or classes like that, so you could construct visual controls in this fashion.

I can't test on Delphi 2010.

type
  TMyBaseClass = class
    FTest: Integer;
    constructor Create(test: integer);
  end;

  TMyClass = class(TMyBaseClass);

  TClass1<T: TMyBaseClass, constructor> = class
  public
    FItem: T;
    procedure Test;
  end;

constructor TMyBaseClass.Create(test: integer);
begin
  FTest := Test;
end;

procedure TClass1<T>.Test;
begin
  FItem := T.Create; // Allocation + 'dummy' constructor in TObject
  try
    TMyBaseClass(FItem).Create(42); // Call actual constructor as a method
  except
    // Normally this is done automatically when constructor fails
    FItem.Free;
    raise;
  end;
end;


// Calling:
var
  o: TClass1<TMyClass>;
begin
  o := TClass1<TMyClass>.Create();
  o.Test;
  ShowMessageFmt('%d', [o.FItem.FTest]);
end;
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type
  TBase = class
    constructor Create (aParam: Integer); virtual;
  end;

  TBaseClass = class of TBase;

  TFabric = class
    class function CreateAsBase (ConcreteClass: TBaseClass; aParam: Integer): TBase;
    class function CreateMyClass<T: TBase>(aParam: Integer): T;
  end;

  TSpecial = class(TBase)
  end;

  TSuperSpecial = class(TSpecial)
    constructor Create(aParam: Integer); override;
  end;

class function TFabric.CreateAsBase(ConcreteClass: TBaseClass; aParam: Integer): TBase;
begin
  Result := ConcreteClass.Create (aParam);
end;

class function TFabric.CreateMyClass<T>(aParam: Integer): T;
begin
  Result := CreateAsBase (T, aParam) as T;
end;

// using
var
  B: TBase;
  S: TSpecial;
  SS: TSuperSpecial;
begin
  B := TFabric.CreateMyClass <TBase> (1);
  S := TFabric.CreateMyClass <TSpecial> (1);
  SS := TFabric.CreateMyClass <TSuperSpecial> (1);
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