Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a 5-tab Tab Bar Controller iPad application. One of the tabs (EKG) is causing memory issues. I have run Instruments and all that I can see is that malloc allocations are constantly increasing and after about 12-mins all of my View Controller first get didReceiveMemoryWarning level 1, followed by level 2, and then SigAbort 0 termination.

The way that the app is designed to work is when the EKG tab is active a setNeedsDisplay is triggered every 200-ms in order to draw (plot) EKG samples across the screen. When I just let the app run normally it is terminated after about 12-mins.

However, if I keep the setNeedsDisplay in and comment out the code in drawRect it will run forever. I am not aware of any memory allocations in my 'drawRect' but someone is doing these mallocs Below is my drawRect code:

- (void) drawRect : (CGRect) rect 
{
    int i, ii, x = 0, xx, y;        

    fEcgDraw = YES;     
    CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext ();
    CGContextSetLineWidth (context, 1);             
    HH = 376;                               
    if (fEcgErase == YES)                           
    {
        CGContextSetStrokeColorWithColor (context,      
                     [UIColor blackColor].CGColor);
/*==============================================================================*/
/* Erase the last screen.                                                       */
/*==============================================================================*/
        for (i = 0; i < 120; i++)                   
        {        
            CGContextMoveToPoint (context,          
                          ECGX[x],
                          (HH - ECGS[x]));      
            CGContextAddLineToPoint (context, ECGX[(x + 1)],    
                         (HH - ECGS[((x + 1) % 119)])); 
            x++;                            
        }   // end - for (i = 0; i < 120; i++)
        CGContextStrokePath (context);          
        fEcgErase = NO;             
    }   // end - if (fEcgErase == YES)
    else if (fECGLOOP)                  
    {
        xx = 1;             
        x = 0;                  
        y = YY;                         
        ii = 0;             
        for (i =
        { 
//          if (xx == 1)                
            {
/*==============================================================================*/
/* First erase the prior ECG A/D plot value.                                    */
/*==============================================================================*/
                CGContextSetStrokeColorWithColor (context,  
                        [UIColor blackColor].CGColor);  
                CGContextMoveToPoint (context,          
                            ECGX[x],    
                            (HH - ECGS[x]));
                CGContextAddLineToPoint (context,       
                            ECGX[(x + 1)],      
                            (HH - ECGS[((x + 1))]));
                CGContextStrokePath (context);          
/*==============================================================================*/
/* Now plot the next ECG A/D plot value.                                        */
/*==============================================================================*/
                CGContextSetStrokeColorWithColor (context,  
                        [UIColor whiteColor].CGColor);  
                CGContextMoveToPoint (context,      
                              ECGX[x],      
                              (HH - ECGY[y]));  
                CGContextAddLineToPoint (context,   
                             ECGX[(x + 1)],     
                             (HH - ECGY[((y + 1) % 119)])); 
                CGContextStrokePath (context);          
                ECGS[x] = ECGY[y];      
                x++;                
                y = ((y + 1) % 119);        
            }   // end - if (xx == 1)
        }       // end - for (i = 0; i < 120; i++)
        y = ((y + count1) % 119);               
        YY = y;                         
        count1 = 0;                 
    }   // end - if (fEcgErase == YES)
    fEcgDraw = NO;                              

}   // end - 'drawRect'
/*===============================END OF FUNCTION================================*/
share|improve this question
    
I have already tried commenting out the 'drawRect' and leaving in the 'setNeedsDisplay' and this makes the problem go away. I am not understanding your comment about iver & gvars, espcially gvars since by definition they have only a single instance. As far as ivars I don't understand how there could be multiples since there is no class instantiation that would alloc more ivars. –  Gil Goodridge Aug 28 '11 at 19:26

2 Answers 2

I don't see any leaks in drawRect:. You can use the ObjectAllocation's instrument and look at the backtraces on the malloc calls to see what is requesting them. You can also leave in your setNeedsDisplay and comment out your entire drawRect:. If memory still grows, then it's somewhere else.

I would also look at the impact that the ivars or global vars you're changing might have on other threads. For instance, is any other thread reading fEcgDraw or HH and might be failing to release memory due to these being messed with in drawRect:?

share|improve this answer
1  
I thought this problem was resolved by adding 'CGContextClosePath' and alas it is not. Here is the latest, if I run my app under Instruments it never fails nor does it report any leaks, etc. I have tried commenting out various parts of my 'drawRect' if an effort to get closer to the problem. Here is what I've found -- if I comment all of 'drawRect' it doesn't fail, if I comment out only the 'CGContextStrokePath' it never fails - so my conclusion is that the culprit (that is losing memory) is 'CGContextStrokePath'. I have no idea how to correct this problem. Any advice? –  Gil Goodridge Aug 29 '11 at 19:36
    
In Instruments, using the Allocations instrument, you should see overall memory usage grow in size, and you should note which kind of object it is. You mentioned it's a malloc, but the size of it is important, and you can tell the instrument to track the allocation stack frames so you can see what is generating them. –  Rob Napier Aug 29 '11 at 20:23
1  
This problem is really strange, the latest is that this problem only happens when I run the app from Xcode (debug or no debug) -- when I run it standalone it runs forever (tested to 1 1/2 hours) without a problem. –  Gil Goodridge Aug 30 '11 at 16:51

Problem has been solved by adding ' CGContextClosePath' before each 'CGContextStrokePath' and the app will now run forever without any 'didReceiveMemoryWarning'.

-Gil Goodridge

share|improve this answer
    
Please accept this as an answer. –  Krishnan Jan 31 '12 at 12:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.