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In mobile development world, which is the best programming language/technology that we can use so that almost the same code that will run on all versions. I know it is little bit of a broad question and the most probable answer is Java. If I want to provide support for maximum number of devices(android, Iphone and other high end classes only), how many different code bases I should have?

Thanks, GL

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3 Answers 3

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[...] that we can use so that almost the same code that will run on all versions [...]

All modern mobile smartphones / devices support HTML 5 / CSS / Javascript.

PhoneGap Augments these basic tools with the rest of the functionality you'd need.

Projects like jQuery Mobile are gaining a lot of traction as well.

I'd start there.

I wouldn't say it's "The Most Widely Used" technology... at least not yet... but I have a hard time believing anyone wouldn't agree things are going that direction.

UPDATE: For anyone who hasn't seen PhoneGap before - this (free) product will take your HTML / CSS / JS, and package them up inside a native application (which includes some shims to startup your app, and augment it with access to camera / files / gyro / etc from javascript). Your app works offline, and can be deployed through all of the available standard app stores.

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Thanks Steve... This looks nice... are there any limitations regarding of the application that we can write using PhoneGap? –  GKL Aug 28 '11 at 11:01
    
Yes and no. You can always "break out" certain functionality that you want/need to be native into native code. PhoneGap probably wouldn't be my first stop if I were looking to build a 3d shooter. But it's good for a lot of things. –  Steve Aug 28 '11 at 19:16

If it's a web app, then you can develop using a highly adaptive layout, HTML 5, CSS, and the JS library of your choice, and you'll be fine.

If you are running native apps, you're pretty much stuck: Java for Android, Objective-C for iOS.

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Not true. Products like PhoneGap (which I mentioned in my answer) provide a way for developers to write in HTML 5 / Javascript, and deploy "native" apps (with full access to camera / gyro / accelerometer, files, etc). PhoneGap will package your HTML / JS into a native application bundle, and it's deployable through both app stores. The app will run offline, etc. Still running HTML / JS, but all the benefits of a native app. –  Steve Aug 27 '11 at 19:55
    
Well, reasonable people can disagree as to whether or not products like PhoneGap are really substitutes for the native environment. By definition, you'll need to make some compromises on which underlying libraries you do and do not take advantage of. And, let's remember that the question was, "Most widely used Mobile app development technology." I'm sure PhoneGap and the like are estimable, but most development shops doing multi-platform development are doing it with the native tools. –  Christophe Sep 5 '11 at 17:12
    
I think we simply read the question differently. The OP contextualized the question with the statement: [...] that we can use so that almost the same code that will run on all versions. Also, the statement: By definition, you'll need to make some compromises on which underlying libraries you do and do not take advantage of. is not really true either. You can call out to native code from JS to do whatever you'd like. –  Steve Sep 5 '11 at 20:28

Regarding HTML5/CSS3, even if it is possible to reuse 90% of codebase (mostly non-rendering JS), there are significant differences when it comes to graphical presentations. Even, if you think that because Androids and Iphones use Webkit, so they should have roughly similar capabilities, they are quite apart.

Just to give a few examples: CSS3 3D transforms are mostly not supported on Android phones (Android 2.3), Audio tag implementation varies between Android and Iphone (Androids do not use buffering and streaming, while Iphones do).

And just do not get me started on how Androids lie about dimensions and aspect ratio. It is a bloody mess.

We have not tested latest Windows mobile phones, but until IE10 is shipped, support for HTML5 in windows world is abysmal.

To conclude, currently, there is no technology, "that we can use so that almost the same code that will run on all versions." HTML5 is 'almost' there, but will take perhaps a few years for Androids to catch up and Webkit to get the required speed and functionality to be able to compete head-on with native apps.

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