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If my response has key "error" I need to process error and show warning box.

Is there "haskey" method exists in json.net? Like:

var x= JObject.Parse(string_my);
if(x.HasKey["error_msg"])
    MessageBox.Show("Error!")
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3 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Just use x["error_msg"]. If the property doesn't exist, it returns null.

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JObject implements IDictionary<string, JToken>, so you can use:

IDictionary<string, JToken> dictionary = x;
if (dictionary.ContainsKey("error_msg"))

... or you could use TryGetValue. It implements both methods using explicit interface implementation, so you can't use them without first converting to IDictionary<string, JToken> though.

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I thin this will be slowly then the accepted answer, but thanks. –  wsevendays Aug 27 '11 at 21:46
1  
@wsevendays, does speed matter to you here or are just microoptimizing (and basing that on guesses)? You should use what you find more readable. –  svick Aug 27 '11 at 21:57
    
The speed of 1GHz processor of my WP7 phone not great and I need to care about speed. –  wsevendays Aug 27 '11 at 22:21
    
@wsevendays: Why would it be slower (or faster) than the accepted answer? –  Jon Skeet Aug 28 '11 at 2:19
7  
@wsevenday: No, it doesn't create a dictionary. JObject already implements IDictionary<string, JToken>. This is just a reference assignment. And no, the accepted answer isn't checking if the key is in an array... it's still using a normal indexer. Just because it looks like array access doesn't mean it is array access. (Array access can't be by a string in the first place.) –  Jon Skeet Aug 29 '11 at 7:10
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Using x["error_msg"], if the key "error_msg" exists but its value is null, it still returns null, right?

James Newton-King, the author of JSON.net, has wrote here http://stackoverflow.com/a/6529408/1125678 but I must admit, a HasKey() method would be really useful.

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If the key exists but it's value is null it will still return a JToken. Calling JToken.Value<string>() would then give you the null value –  Despertar Nov 14 '13 at 21:19
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