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So I was researching C++ yesterday; looking at some example code, and trying to get the feel of things. I saw this:

for (bool b = true; b; )
{
    b = true;
    //Other stuff.
}

It's making me feel stupid because this is the first time I've seen a for loop used this way. Basically, what is this saying? What would be an equivalent while loop?

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that is a truly bizarre way of expressing that. –  Flexo Aug 27 '11 at 21:21
1  
Ew, that was in example code? –  Maxpm Aug 27 '11 at 21:24
    
The b = true in the braces does nothing; it only gets called to set b to true when b is true –  Will03uk Aug 27 '11 at 23:59

2 Answers 2

It's the same as:

bool b = true; // 1

while(b) // 2
{
    b = true;
    //Other stuff.
    // 3
}

The 3 semicolon-separated parts of a for loop always correspond to the places I commented in the while loop.

Don't think of it as a clever way to save a couple lines, though. Anyone who writes code like you saw should be taken out and shot.

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Thank you; I now get the picture. –  Randolph Levant Aug 27 '11 at 21:21
3  
Shot ? How gentle. –  Jonathan Merlet Aug 27 '11 at 21:23
2  
I appreciate the sentiment but it doesn't just save a couple of lines, it also limits the scope of the b variable. –  tinman Aug 27 '11 at 21:30
    
yeah, @tinman is right. Besides, you get a picture of how the variable of the loop is going to change in the loop, rather than having to look at top and bottom of the loop. Even if it makes it look more complicated. For example for (int i, scanf("%d", &i); i; scanf("%d", &i)) {...} makes much more sense to me than the while equivalent (although in this very particular case, I would write: int i; while (scanf("%d", &i), i) {...}) –  Shahbaz Aug 27 '11 at 23:18
1  
@jadarnel27: His answer was correct, I don't want to put a lot of answers for the OP that are basically all the same, just confusing the OP. –  Shahbaz Aug 28 '11 at 7:46
do
{
  b = true;
  // Other stuff
} while(b);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you; this was very helpful. –  Randolph Levant Aug 27 '11 at 21:21
2  
It's wrong, a for loop checks the condition before do the body –  BlackBear Aug 27 '11 at 21:35
    
@BlackBear This may not be equivalent of for loop in general, but by given information, it is very much same as the given for loop. –  Ajeet Aug 27 '11 at 21:38
    
@Ajeet: ah, now I see ;) –  BlackBear Aug 27 '11 at 21:39

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