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Text file 1 has the following format:

'WORD': 1
'MULTIPLE WORDS': 1
'WORD': 2

etc.

I.e., a word separated by a colon followed by a number.

Text file 2 has the following format:

'WORD'
'WORD'

etc.

I need to extract single words (i.e., only WORD not MULTIPLE WORDS) from File 1 and, if they match a word in File 2, return the word from File 1 along with its value.

I have some poorly functioning code:

def GetCounts(file1, file2):
    target_contents  = open(file1).readlines()  #file 1 as list--> 'WORD': n
    match_me_contents = open(file2).readlines()   #file 2 as list -> 'WORD'
    ls_stripped = [x.strip('\n') for x in match_me_contents]  #get rid of newlines

    match_me_as_regex= re.compile("|".join(ls_stripped))   

    for line in target_contents:
        first_column = line.split(':')[0]  #get the first item in line.split
        number = line.split(':')[1]   #get the number associated with the word
        if len(first_column.split()) == 1: #get single word, no multiple words 
            """ Does the word from target contents match the word
            from match_me contents?  If so, return the line from  
            target_contents"""
            if re.findall(match_me_as_regex, first_column):  
                print first_column, number

#OUTPUT: WORD, n
         WORD, n
         etc.

Because of the use of regex, the output is shotty. The code will return 'asset, 2', for example, since re.findall() will match 'set' from match_me. I need to match the target_word with the entire word from match_me to block the bad output resulting from partial regex matches.

share|improve this question
    
No that was a mistake. Just fixed it. I mistakenly pressed submit before editing. –  Renklauf Aug 28 '11 at 2:27
    
Please also provide a mock-up of the desired output, and edit your inputs to demonstrate the described problem. –  bukzor Aug 28 '11 at 2:28
    
To avoid "partial regex matches," try reverse sorting your word list by length: re.compile("|".join(sorted(ls_stripped, reverse=True, key=len))) –  twneale Aug 28 '11 at 2:38
    
twneale: that doesn't help... You will still incorrectly match "asset" when ls_stripped just ['set']. The correct fix is to add the special \A and \Z to the pattern, but even better is to not use re at all. –  bukzor Aug 28 '11 at 2:44
    
@bokzor: you're right--special characters would be necessary. I don't agree that regexes are categorically bad though, especially when they greatly simplify code and reduce boilerplate. –  twneale Aug 28 '11 at 2:57

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If file2 is not humongous, slurp them into a set:

file2=set(open("file2").read().split())
for line in open("file1"):
    if line.split(":")[0].strip("'") in file2:
        print line
share|improve this answer
    
better to use set than list here. it handles duplicates nicely, and you can check for 'in' in constant (rather than linear) time. –  bukzor Aug 28 '11 at 2:52
    
Also, since split() splits on all whitespace, if file2 has a line with multiple words this will be split into two (or more) separate words. –  Blair Aug 28 '11 at 2:57
    
@bukzor, I am assuming his file2 only contains unique words. Otherwise, yes, a set is better.@Blair, again, I am considering only one word in his file2, since there is no special mention in his examples they contain multiple words. Otherwise, yes, split on newlines would be better. –  ghostdog74 Aug 28 '11 at 3:03
    
@ghostdog74: in fact it's better regardless of duplicates. You can check membership in a set in constant time, but a similar check in a list will grow with the length of the list. –  bukzor Aug 28 '11 at 3:04
    
@Blair: in fact the OP mentions that he particularly wants to only match single words and not phrases, so split() seems to do that nicely. –  bukzor Aug 28 '11 at 3:05

I guess by "poorly functioning" you mean speed wise? Because I tested and it does appear to work.

You could make things more efficient by making a set of the words in file2:

word_set = set(ls_stripped)

And then instead of findall you'd see if it's in the set:

in_set = just_word in word_set

Also feels cleaner than a regex.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, the code returns bad output due to the partial regex matches. So that's the 'poorly functioning' part. The regex approach was a bad idea to begin with... –  Renklauf Aug 28 '11 at 18:21

This is how I'd do this. I don't have a python interpreter on hand, so there may be a couple typos.

One of the main things you should remember when coming to Python (especially if coming from Perl) is that regular expressions are usually a bad idea: the string methods are powerful and very fast.

def GetCounts(file1, file2):
    data = {}
    for line in open(file1):
        try:
            word, n = line.rsplit(':', 1)
        except ValueError: # not enough values
            #some kind of input error, go to next line
            continue
        n = int(n.strip())
        if word[0] == word[-1] == "'":
            word = word[1:-1]
        data[word] = n

    for line in open(file2):
        word = line.strip()
        if word[0] == word[-1] == "'":
            word = word[1:-1]
        if word in data:
            print word, data[word]
share|improve this answer

It seems like this may simply be a special case of grep. If file2 is essentially a list of patterns, and the output format is the same as file1, then you might be able to just do this:

grep -wf file2 file1

The -w tells grep to match only whole words.

share|improve this answer
    
If this works, it deserves a fat upvote :) –  twneale Aug 28 '11 at 2:55
    
grep -f =(cat file2 | sed 's/$/\\b/' | sed 's/^/\\b/') file1 so you match whole words. –  Owen Aug 28 '11 at 3:01
    
This works, providing (a) file2 does not have multiple words on a line and (b) grep is available on the target system. –  Blair Aug 28 '11 at 3:01
1  
@Owen: grep -w does this much more nicely. I've updated the answer. –  bukzor Aug 28 '11 at 3:07
import re, methodcaller

re_target = re.compile(r"^'([a-z]+)': +(\d+)", re.M|re.I)
match_me_contents = open(file2).read().splitlines()
match_me_contents = set(map(methodcaller('strip', "'"), match_me_contents))

res = []
for match in re_target.finditer(open(file1).read()):
    word, value = match.groups()
    if word in match_me_contents:
        res.append((word, value))
share|improve this answer

My two input files:

file1.txt:

'WORD': 1
'MULTIPLE WORDS': 1
'OTHER': 2

file2.txt:

'WORD'
'NONEXISTENT'

If file2.txt is guaranteed not to have multiple words on a line, then there is no need to explicitly filter these from the first file. This will be done by the membership test:

# Build a set of what words we can return a count for.
with open('file2.txt', 'r') as f:
    allowed_words = set(word.strip() for word in f)

# See which of them exist in the first file.
with open('file1.txt', 'r') as f:
    for line in f:
        word, count = line.strip().split(':')

        # This assumes that strings with a space (multiple words) do not exist in
        # the second file.
        if word in allowed_words:
            print word, count

And running this gives:

$ python extract.py
'WORD' 1

If file2.txt might contain multiple words, simply modify the test in the loop:

# Build a set of what words we can return a count for.
with open('file2.txt', 'r') as f:
    allowed_words = set(word.strip() for word in f)

# See which of them exist in the first file.
with open('file1.txt', 'r') as f:
    for line in f:
        word, count = line.strip().split(':')

        # This prevents multiple words from being selected.
        if word in allowed_words and not ' ' in word:
            print word, count

Note I haven't bothered stripping the quotes from the words. I'm not sure if this is necessary - it depends on whether the input is guaranteed to have them or not. It would be trivial to add them.

Something else you should consider is case-sensitivity. If lowercase and uppercase words should be treated as the same, then you should convert all input to uppercase (or lowercase, it does not matter which) prior to doing any testing.

EDIT: It would probably be more efficient to remove multiple words from the set of allowed words, rather than doing the check on every line of file1:

# Build a set of what words we can return a count for.
with open('file2.txt', 'r') as f:
    allowed_words = set(word.strip() for word in f if not ' ' in f)

# See which of them exist in the first file.
with open('file1.txt', 'r') as f:
    for line in f:
        word, count = line.strip().split(':')

        # Check if the word is allowed.
        if word in allowed_words:
            print word, count
share|improve this answer

This is what I came up with:

def GetCounts(file1, file2):
    target_contents  = open(file1).readlines()  #file 1 as list--> 'WORD': n
    match_me_contents = set(open(file2).read().split('\n'))   #file 2 as list -> 'WORD'  
    for line in target_contents:
        word = line.split(': ')[0]  #get the first item in line.split
        if " " not in word:
            number = line.split(': ')[1]   #get the number associated with the word
            if word in match_me_contents:  
                print word, number

Changes from your version:

  • Moved to set from a regex
  • Went to split instead of readlines to get rid of newlines without extra processing
  • Changed from splitting the word into words and checking if the length of that is one to simply checking if a space is in the "word" directly
    • This could cause a bug if the "space" isn't an actual space though.This could be fixed with a regex for "\s" or equivalent instead, however with a performance penalty.
  • Added a space into line.split(': ') so that that way number won't be prefixed with a space
    • This could cause a bug if there is not a space before the number.
  • Moved number = line.split(': ')[1] after the checking to see if the word contains spaces for efficiency purposes, minor though the speed difference would be (almost certainly the bulk of the time would be spent checking is a work was in the target)

The potential bugs would only occur however if the actual input is not in the format you presented.

share|improve this answer

Let's exploit the similarity of the file format to Python expression syntax:

from ast import literal_eval
with file("file1") as f:
  word_values = ast.literal_eval('{' + ','.join(line for line in f) + '}')
with file("file2") as f:
  expected_words = set(ast.literal_eval(line) for line in f)
word_values = {k: v for (k, v) in word_values if k in expected_words}
share|improve this answer
    
Works beautifully. Already reading up on the ast module. –  Renklauf Aug 28 '11 at 18:03

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