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I have two objects, whitepawn and blackpawn, that are of type Piece. Everything about these two objects is the same except for the image used. Currently this is the code I use to draw the white pawn,

void Pawn::paintEvent(QPaintEvent *)
{
    pixmap.load(":/whitepawn.png");

    QPainter paint(this);
    paint.drawPixmap(x, y, pixmap);
}

Is there a way to use a different image for blackpawn with making a new class and overriding the new class's paintEvent function?

Edit: The old title was for a different question, ignore that if you saw it.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Virtual functions are the standard solution here:

class Pawn
{
  virtual void paintEvent(QPaintEvent *) { }
  // ...
};

class WhitePawn : public Pawn
{
  virtual voidpaintEvent(QPaintEvent *)
  {
    pixmap.load(":/whitepawn.png");
    QPainter paint(this);
    paint.drawPixmap(x, y, pixmap);
  }
};

// similar for class BlackPawn

Now you can call Pawn * p = new BlackPawn; p->paintEvent(e); and get the correct function. (The term here is "overriding", not "overloading", which is something different.)


Edit: Seeing Owen's fine answer, another idea that requires changing the constructors is to make the filename a member variable:

class Pawn
{
  public: Pawn(const std::string & filename = "") : m_filename(filename) { }
  void paintEvent(QPaintEvent *)
  {
    if (m_filename == "") return;

    pixmap.load(m_filename);
    QPainter paint(this);
    paint.drawPixmap(x, y, pixmap);
  }
  // ...
  private: std::string m_filename;
};

class BlackPawn : public Pawn
{
  public: BlackPawn() : Pawn(":/blackpawn.png") { }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Yea, my backup plan was your first method, but I didn't want to make a separate class for each pawn since they're so similar. And your second solution is really nice too, but again, I'm avoiding extra classes.Edit: So turns out Owen made a mistake, so I'm going with your second method. –  gsingh2011 Aug 28 '11 at 2:44
    
@gsingh: Well, there aren't any extra classes here, since you said you already have the two derived classes, but changing the base class is certainly more intrusive than Owen's idea with a virtual function returning the string value. –  Kerrek SB Aug 28 '11 at 2:47
    
Ah, I too misunderstood and thought you already had derived classes! OK, if you don't want derived classes, you can just keep the base class from my second example and put the file name in the constructor. –  Kerrek SB Aug 28 '11 at 2:49
    
@Kerrer: Actually, that was a typo on my part, see the comment on Owen's post. Sorry. –  gsingh2011 Aug 28 '11 at 2:50
    
@gsingh: I see. Please don't say "inherit" in your post then! :-) –  Kerrek SB Aug 28 '11 at 2:55

Sure, you can

class Pawn {
    public:
    virtual char const* imageFileName() = 0;
};

Sorry, I was skimpy on the explanation last time and made it look like there weren't extra classes, there really should be:

class WhitePawn : public Pawn {
    public:
    virtual char const* imageFileName();
};

Then override (+ declaration):

char const* WhitePawn::imageFileName() { return "./whitepawn.png"; }

char const* BlackPawn::imageFilename() { return "./blackpawn.png"; }

and call imageFilename() from paintEvent():

void Pawn::paintEvent(QPaintEvent *)
{
    pixmap.load(imageFilename());

    QPainter paint(this);
    paint.drawPixmap(x, y, pixmap);
}

But I personally like Kerrek's idea of making it a variable. You could even do that without making extra classes:

class Pawn {
    public:
    Pawn(char const *filename) : filename(filename) { }

    private:
    char const *filname;
};

Pawn whitePawn("./whitepawn.png");
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, much better than my override of the whole function! Actually, you could even make the filename a member variable... –  Kerrek SB Aug 28 '11 at 2:35
    
Oh, I thought only classes could override the inherited classes functions. I didn't know you could override functions for specific objects! Thanks, that helps alot. –  gsingh2011 Aug 28 '11 at 2:39
    
@gsingh2011 Oh no, I misinterpreted! I thought BlackPawn and WhitePawn were classes. No, unfortunately it won't work for just objects. –  Owen Aug 28 '11 at 2:42
    
But as Kerrek says, you could make it a variable. –  Owen Aug 28 '11 at 2:43
    
@Owen Oh, ok. I got excited :( Anyway, Kerrek's method is good too. And the misinterpretation was my fault, I meant that both "objects" inherited from the class "Piece", not "Pawn". –  gsingh2011 Aug 28 '11 at 2:46

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