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I ran into this blog post today.

I'll summarize. The blogger is commenting on this code and saying it was ugly.

// var line1 = person.Address.Lines.Line1 ?? string.Empty;
// throws NullReferenceException: 
//    {"Object reference not set to an instance of an object."}

// The ugly alternative

var line1 = person.Address == null
    ? "n/a"
    : person.Address.Lines == null
    ? "n/a"
    : person.Address.Lines.Line1;

The blogger then goes on to write a class that allows you to replace above code with a new syntax.

var line2 = Dis.OrDat<string>(() => person.Address.Lines.Line2, "n/a");

The code for the Class Dis is as follows.

 public static class Dis
  {
    public static T OrDat<T>(Expression<Func<T>> expr, T dat)
    {
      try
      {
        var func = expr.Compile();
        var result = func.Invoke();
        return result ?? dat; //now we can coalesce
      }
      catch (NullReferenceException)
      {
        return dat;
      }
    }
  }

So the first question I have is why would the original code containing ?? have to be replaced with the accursed looking ?: code.

My second question is why use the expression tree over the Null Coalesce? The only reason I can think of it is because they are using lazy initialization, but that is not clear from the post, nor is it clear from the test code, which is in the blogpost. I'll post that here as well.

BTW, anyone know how to create a fixed sized code block window? Or is a non scrolling codeblock prefered here? I didn't see anything in the Meta blog.

share|improve this question
    
If you post a very long code block, it will get scroll bars. Code blocks such as in your post seem fine to me. I prefer to just use the main browser scroll bar, and not have to use nested scroll bars. Very long code blocks are probably too long. –  Douglas Aug 28 '11 at 2:48
1  
@Douglas: I agree with the main scroll bars. Was just checking for the proper convention since I rarely post code. –  surfasb Aug 28 '11 at 13:10
    
Thanks for asking, your code looks fine. If you're after a more detailed response, you could try meta.stackoverflow.com –  Douglas Aug 28 '11 at 13:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The code is the blog is worse. A method name Dis.OrDat is ugly, and doesn't describe what the method actually does.

The use of an Expression<T> is redundant, it could just be:

public static T OrDat<T>(Func<T> func, T dat)
{
  try
  {
    return func() ?? dat;
  }
  catch (NullReferenceException)
  {
    return dat;
  }
}

He calls Compile and Invoke one after another right away, so he doesn't actually do anything with the expression tree. Passing in the Func<T> as is would be the same, without the overhead of compiling the Func.

But worse, the code uses exceptions for flow control, which is always bad: the person.Address property appears to be optional, so it isn't "exceptional" for it to be null, so an exception shouldn't be thrown by code which uses it. The catch above can't distinguish between person.Address == null and the implementation of the Address property getter being broken internally causing an NullReferenceException to be thrown. It just swallows them all.

So, overall, I'd be happy to disregard the blog post.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Exceptions for flow control. Don't let the run-time throw exceptions if you can validate the values yourself. –  Erik Philips Aug 28 '11 at 4:05
    
@Douglas: I've never actually used an expression tree explicitly so that threw me off. But I like the reminder of not to use exceptions for flow control. I've done that one too many times. –  surfasb Aug 28 '11 at 13:21

I do not see any reason to use expression trees in blogged sample, Func is enough there.

My suggestion is using Maybe monad iplementation, instead of that code. See example.

public static class Maybe
{
    public static TResult With<T, TResult>(this T self, Func<T, TResult> func) where T : class
    {
        if (self != null)
            return func(self);
        return default(TResult);
    }

    public static TResult Return<T, TResult>(this T self, Func<T, TResult> func, TResult result) where T : class
    {
        if (self != null)
            return func(self);
        return result;
    }
}

And your code becomes:

var line2 = person
   .With(p => p.Address)
   .With(a => a.Lines)
   .Return(l => l.Line2, "n/a");
share|improve this answer

To protect this code:

var line1 = person.Address.Lines.Line1 ?? string.Empty;

from throwing NullReferenceException

I would simply use:

var line1 = string.Empty;
if ((person.Address != null) && (person.Address.Lines != null))
   line1 = person.Address.Lines.Line1 ?? string.Empty;

rather than the Bloggers this or that (Dis.OrDat),

share|improve this answer
    
I think the blogger was trying to avoid a solution like this because it doesn't look like it scales out well. –  surfasb Aug 28 '11 at 13:25

the problem with the first line of code ( var line1 = person.Address.Lines.Line1 ?? string.Empty ) is that it will throw an error if person, Address or Lines is null. The null coalescing operator is only working on the result of the entire expression.

It's a fairly elegant solution but I'd want to check what the performance of expression trees was like before I started sprinkling this through my code (but only because I got bit by overuse of reflection in the past before I knew what a dog it was)

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For your first question, the code in question:

var line1 = person.Address.Lines.Line1 ?? string.Empty;

will throw a NullReferenceException if person, Address, or Lines is null. The replacement code using the ternary if statements protects against that case. The null coalescing operator will only operate on the Line1 property, so it can't protect against the rest of the expression being null.

For your second question, the reason for using the expression tree is probably to "simplify" the code required to ensure the entire expression can be evauluated. While the code would work, I think it introduces a layer of complexity and overhead that isn't really necessary or needed.

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