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This function takes two integers and returns the list of all integers in the range [a,b]

This is the solution that I wrote.

let rec range_rec l a b = 
  if (a=b) then l@[b]
  else range_rec (l@[a], a+1, b);;

let range a b = range_rec [] a b;;

I'm hitting an error "Error: This expression has type int list * int * int but an expression was expected of type int". Can someone throw some light on why am I getting this error?

Thanks.

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What did you think "loop" was going to do? –  Chris Conway Aug 28 '11 at 11:37
    
Sorry Chris. That was a typo. I was trying to make it more clear. –  Sunday Programmer Aug 28 '11 at 12:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It should look like this:

let rec range_rec l a b = 
  if a = b then l @ [b]
  else range_rec (l @ [a]) (a + 1) b;;

let range a b = range_rec [] a b;;

What I've done:

  1. Changed loop to range_rec
  2. Changed (l@[a], a+1, b) to (l @ [a]) (a + 1) b. The first is a triplet and the second is 3 arguments to a curried function.
  3. Notice that if (a = b) then can be written as if a = b then.

Last, the function can be made more efficient by using :: instead of @ by looping "backwards". For example like gasche have shown.

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Sorry. The 1st change was actually a typo. But it wasnt there in the actual program. You mean to say, I had to have additional braces surrounding (a+1) and I had to remove the braces surrounding the 3 arguments? Why is that? –  Sunday Programmer Aug 28 '11 at 12:42
    
@Sunday Something ala let rec f (a, b) = is a function which takes a tuple in Ocaml. Where let rec f a b = is really a function, which returns a function. It is not like C-like languages. See "Functions" in files.metaprl.org/doc/ocaml-book.pdf or caml.inria.fr/pub/docs/oreilly-book/ocaml-ora-book.pdf - It is really difficult to explain the type-system and functions in short space :) –  Lasse Espeholt Aug 28 '11 at 20:04
1  
Thanks Lasse. I cant give reputation to your answer cuz I'm a newbie. I hope someone gives it. –  Sunday Programmer Aug 29 '11 at 1:53

The l @ [elem] operation is terrible from a performance perspective : as a @ b is linear in the length of a, adding an element to the end of list is linear in the length of the list, making your whole range_rec definition quadratic in |b-a|. The way to go is to change your code so that you can use the constant-time elem::l operation instead.

let rec range a b =
  if a > b then []
  else a :: range (a + 1) b

You may make additional optimizations such as making it tail-recursive, but at least the complexity of this solution is right.

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Good advice, but you haven't answered the question. –  Chris Conway Aug 28 '11 at 11:36
    
Thanks Gasche. Any idea why my function was bumping into error? –  Sunday Programmer Aug 28 '11 at 13:14
    
@Chris: sometimes one is interested in answers that go beyong what was explicitely asked. lasseespeholt already proposed a fix for the syntactic mistake. If you're interested into giving a detailed explanation of why f (x, y, z) and f x y z are typed differently, please do. –  gasche Aug 28 '11 at 22:08
    
Thanks Gasche. I cant give reputation to your answer cuz I'm a newbie. I hope someone gives it –  Sunday Programmer Aug 29 '11 at 1:53

To improve on the solution already suggested by gasche, this can be made tail-recursive.

let int_range a b =
  let rec int_range_rec l a b =
    if a > b then l
    else int_range_rec (b :: l) a (b - 1)
  in (int_range_rec [] a b);;
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