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Lets say I execute the following in the CMD shell:

set FOO=bar

Is there a way to undefine this variable, other than recycling the CMD shell?

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6  
Do you really mean MS-DOS (which has been dead for at least 10 years or so) - or do you say MS-DOS but really mean the Windows command line (cmd.exe) ?? –  marc_s Aug 28 '11 at 7:54
1  
Likely, but it doesn't really matter for that question... –  Second Rikudo Aug 28 '11 at 9:17
1  
Marc's right. This is not the MS-DOS shell. People never learn that this is a big difference. –  Michael-O Aug 28 '11 at 9:32

4 Answers 4

Yes, you can unset it with

set FOO=

Important Note: Make sure no trailing whitespaces/other invisible characters are after the =. set FOO= != set FOO= 

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3  
Just be sure that there isn't a trailing blank. :) –  Ted Hopp Aug 28 '11 at 7:55
    
You are correct. Edited answer to include that. Thanks @ted –  Second Rikudo Aug 28 '11 at 9:19
    
Even better: Add double quotes for explicitness: set "FOO=" –  kevinarpe Nov 5 at 9:55

A secure way to unset the variable is to use also quotes, then there aren't problems with trailing spaces.

set FOO=bar
echo %FOO%
set "FOO=" text after the last quote is ignored
echo %FOO%
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This works for me in my Windows 7 CMD shell:

set FOO=bar 
echo %FOO% // bar
set FOO= 
echo %FOO% // empty; calling "set" no longer lists it
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1  
Spaces are significant in the set command. If you try set FOO = bar and then try set FOO=, it won't unset 'FOO '. For some reason, though, they aren't (as?) significant inside % %. –  Ted Hopp Aug 28 '11 at 8:00
    
@ted good point! Fixed, thanks. –  Pekka 웃 Aug 28 '11 at 8:00

another method

@Echo oFF

setlocal
set FOO=bar
echo %FOO%
endlocal

echo %FOO%

pause

Note: This would not work on an interactive command prompt. But works in batch script.

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